NURS 6053 WK2 Assignment.docx - Analysis of Nursing...

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Analysis of Nursing Shortage as a National Health Care Issue Anthony Okongwu Walden University NURS – 6053N-42: Interprofessional Organizational and Systems Leadership March 8, 2020 1
Nursing Shortage as a National Health Care Issue Nurses make up the majority of healthcare professionals in the United States, and they play one of the most significant roles in patient care and safety. The shortage of nurses compromises the effectiveness of the crucial roles they play, affects the functionality of health care organizations in many aspects, and invariably affects patients care outcomes. According to Marshall & Broome (2017), the population of nurses available to serve in health care today is affected by factors such as shortage of nursing faculty and the newer system of care delivery, which demands the services of nurses in a nontraditional clinical setting. Other factors contributing to nursing shortage according to American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), (2019), include the number of nurses retiring higher than those entering the workforce, inadequate staffing, and unhealthy work environment causing experienced nurses to be leaving the nursing field at a high rate. Nonetheless, health care organizations are implementing evidence-based strategies in combating the shortage of nurses in their health care settings. The purpose of this paper is to describe nursing shortage as a national issue, its impact on my organization, a summary of two works of literature on the subject, and how the strategies described in the works of literature for addressing nursing shortage may affect the organization where I practice. A nursing shortage occurs when the number of nurses needed to work is higher than the supply. According to AACN (2019), the estimate by the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates that Registered Nurses (RN) are expected to be among the occupations that will experience high job growth from 2016 through 2026. The estimated RN workforce growth from 2016 to 2026 is two million nine hundred thousand to three million four hundred thousand (AACN, 2019). An extra 2
two hundred and three thousand seven hundred fresh RNs are needed to fill the newly created positions and the vacuum created by retiring nurses (AACN, 2019). The shortage of nurses persists because of an imbalance in demand and supply of nurses. This imbalance is a result of the number of registered nurses produced by nursing schools less than the number of vacant positions. For example, eighty percent of baccalaureate-prepared nurses (BPN) is in demand in 2010, but only fifty-six percent of BPN or graduate-level nurses were produced (AACN, 2019). Besides, according to AACN (2019), the low supply of fresh graduates is because of lack of the sufficient number of nursing faculty evidenced by the rejection of over seventy-five thousand qualified applicants by nursing schools in 2018 due to shortage of nursing faculty, clinical sites, clinical preceptors, classrooms, and funds. Also, more nurses are retiring because

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