Syllabus-Fall2010 - ECP 3203 Labor Economics University of...

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ECP 3203: Labor Economics University of Florida Department of Economics Fall 2010 Professor Sarah Hamersma 304 Matherly Hall 846-1988 [email protected] http://bear.warrington.ufl.edu/hamersma/Teaching/ECP3203/ Class Time: Mondays and Wednesdays, periods 2-3 (8:30-10:25) and 5-6 (10:40 – 12:35) Office Hours: Wednesday afternoons 1:00pm-2:00pm; Friday mornings 9:00am-10:00am Classroom: Matherly Hall, Room 119 Credits: 4 Course description and objectives: The objective of this course is to provide you with an introduction to the broad field of labor economics. You will become familiar with models of how firms make decisions about their need for workers, how workers make labor supply decisions, and how wages and other benefits are determined. We will also discuss historical labor market trends and other important issues that affect the labor market such as immigration, discrimination, and unions. Throughout the course, we will investigate the effects of relevant public policies (such as minimum wage, employment subsidies, and unemployment insurance) on the labor market. Prerequisites: It will be assumed that you are familiar and comfortable with the vocabulary, concepts, mathematics, and graphical representations presented in basic microeconomics. Basic calculus (derivatives) will be needed as well. Textbook & Readings: Required: The course packet is available at the Orange and Blue Textbooks store (~$25). It contains the 7 articles you will be reading in detail for the course, along with some old exams. Recommended: The recommended textbook for the course is Modern Labor Economics: Theory and Public Policy by Ronald G. Ehrenberg and Robert S. Smith (7 th edition or newer is good). There is also a helpful website associated with the book that provides added material such as summaries and quizzes for each chapter ( http://wps.aw.com/aw_ehrensmith_mlaborecon_9/ ). The lecture material is frequently drawn from the textbook, so it is a good reference for reinforcing the lectures. However, the book is not a good substitute for attending lecture.
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