Turbulence lecture 3

Turbulence lecture 3 - Turbulence Lecture 3 1. Properties...

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Turbulence Lecture 3 1. Properties of a turbulent flow A. Flows can be described by the usual N-S equations and I.C.’s and B.C.’s Continuum approach is valid. Newtonian fluid. Can’t solve the problem by throwing out the N-.S. Equations. Smallest scales of turbulent flow are much larger than molecular scales. Turbulent flows are highly irregular, random, or chaotic. V(t) t A completely deterministic approach is not possible (resolvable) yet and so must bring in statistical methods. They are not completely chaotic in the sense of “white noise”, there are some correlations in the flow. It is expected to have structures. C. Turbulent flows are unstable and arise as a result of flow instability. Typically this implies large or small . Re Ri JG G Assume u ( 1 0 ,) x t JJ G GG 2 u G ( 0 x t + () x ε Where x is small in some sense. Both flows satisfy B.C.’s, etc. As time goes on the two flows diverge, although the statistical properties remain the same.
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This note was uploaded on 06/07/2011 for the course EGM 6341 taught by Professor Mei during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

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Turbulence lecture 3 - Turbulence Lecture 3 1. Properties...

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