COM 150 FINAL - Running head DRAFT OR VOLUNTEER 1 Draft or...

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Running head: DRAFT OR VOLUNTEER 1 Draft or Volunteer JOHN W. REESE SR. COM 150 MAY 1, 2011
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DRAFT OR VOLUNTEER 2 Draft or Volunteer Since the beginning of the nation, US Armed forces have been primarily an All- Volunteer Force (AFV) and at other times a combination of a volunteer and a draft force. We will explore the significant aspects of a military draft and differences of a Drafted Force compared to an All-Volunteer Force. With the high tempo put on the AFV a draft may give those AFV members with back to back deployments a long earned break from combat. Even though a volunteer force cost more than a drafted force, a volunteer force may be more appropriate with public opinion and quality of service members. In August 2007, the senior military officer selected as President Bush’s “war czar” declared in an interview that Washington should consider reinstating a military draft to relieve the pressure on the armed forces as a result of the ongoing conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Lieutenant General Lute stated, “I think it makes sense to certainly think it, all things considered… And I can tell you, this has always been an option on the table. But ultimately, this is a policy matter between meeting the demands for the nation's security by one means or another," (Lute, 2007)[ sic ] The current draft has its origins in the Civil War, when both the United States and the Confederate States instituted a draft. Prior to that time, the primary source of armed forces in the United States was a militia, which was maintained by the states. The colonies raised a small paid force to fight the Revolutionary War, but could not muster up enough troops to last the entire war. President Franklin Roosevelt signed the Selective Training and Service Act of 1940, which created the nation's first peacetime draft and formally established the Selective Service System as
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DRAFT OR VOLUNTEER 3 an independent Federal agency. From 1948 until 1973, during both peacetime and periods of conflict, men were drafted to fill vacancies in the armed forces which could not be filled through voluntary means. A lottery drawing - the first since 1942 was held on December 1, 1969, at Selective Service National Headquarters in Washington, D.C. This event determined the sequence of draw for induction during calendar year 1970, which was for registrants born between 1944 and 1950. Reinstitution of the lottery was a change from the oldest first method, which had been the determining process for deciding the order of call. In 1973, the draft ended and the U.S. converted to an All-Volunteer military. The registration requirement was suspended
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This note was uploaded on 06/05/2011 for the course COM 150 taught by Professor Johannahvanatta during the Spring '08 term at University of Phoenix.

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COM 150 FINAL - Running head DRAFT OR VOLUNTEER 1 Draft or...

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