Communicating in Organization

Communicating in - Communicating in Organization Chapter 18 Communication and the Managers Job How important is communication Managers spend at

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Communicating in Organization Chapter 18
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Communication and the Manager’s Job How important is communication? Managers spend at least 80 percent of every working day in direct communication with others . In other words , 48 minutes of every hour is spent in meetings, on the telephone , or talking informally while walking around. In other 20 percent of a typical manager’s time is spent doing desk work, most of which is also communication in the form of reading and writing. Communication skills are a fundamental part of every managerial activity
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Communication and the Manager’s Job Managers gather important information from both inside and outside the organization and then distribute appropriate information to others who need it. Communication permeates every management function . For example, when managers perform the planning function , they gather information; write letters, memos, and reports; and meet with other manager to explain the plan.When managers lead, they communicate to share a vision of hat the organization can be and motivate employees to help achieve it.
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What is Communication? Communication /C./ can be defined as a process by which information is exchanged and understood by two or more people, usually with the intent to motivate or influence behavior. C. is not just sending information. Management C. is a two-way street that includes listening and other forms of feedback.
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The communication process Two common elements in every C. situation are the sender and the receiver . The sender is anyone who wishes to convey an idea or concept to others, to seek information, or to express a thought or emotion. The receiver is the person to whom the message is sent. The sender encodes the idea by selecting symbols with which to compose a message. The message is the tangible formulation of the idea that is sent through a channel /formal report, a telephone call, or face-to –face meeting.
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The communication process The receiver decodes symbols to interpret the meaning of the message. Finally, feedback occurs when the receiver responds to the sender’s C. with a return message. Managers have a choice of many channels through which to communicate to other managers or employees. Channels differ in their capacity to convey information. Channel richness is the amount of information that can be transmitted during a C. episode.
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The capacity of an information channel is influenced by three characteristics: 1. The ability to handle multiple cues simultaneously ; 2. The ability to facilitate rapid, two-way feedback; 3. The ability to establish a personal focus for the C. Face-to–face discussion is the richest
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This note was uploaded on 06/05/2011 for the course MANAGMENT 25 taught by Professor Fu during the Spring '11 term at Asbury.

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Communicating in - Communicating in Organization Chapter 18 Communication and the Managers Job How important is communication Managers spend at

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