Plant Kingdom - Transition from Water to Land: 6/6/11...

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6/6/11 Transition from Water to Land:
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6/6/11 Considering evolutionary history, hypothesize where
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6/6/11 Figure 27.29
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6/6/11 How did Land Plants Arise? Common ancestor mostly likely a green algae Shared characteristics: Both have chlorophyll a and b Both undergo the process of photosynthesis Both produce glucose, which is stored as starch
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6/6/11
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6/6/11 Evolution of Plants
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6/6/11 Considering the transition from water to land, what
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6/6/11 Adaptations to Land- Plants No longer in direct contact of water, need to prevent drying out. Need a transport system to bathe all the cells Dispersal of gametes (Alternation of Generation) Sporophyte: diploid- produces haploid spores by meiosis
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6/6/11 Alteration of generations
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6/6/11 Early Structural Adaptations Cuticle- waxy covering that retards waters loss Stomata- small openings and closings in the leaves and stems for gas exchange Gametangia (sex organs) and sporangia- reproductive cells are protected by several layers of non- reproductive cells
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6/6/11 Non-Vascular Plants
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6/6/11 How would you define the term,
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6/6/11 Non-Vascular Plants Lack specialized means to transport water and nutrients Since they lack true vascular tissue, they have modified: Leaves (Leaf-like) Stems (Stem-like) Roots (Root-like)
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6/6/11 Non-vascular plants tend to be quite small, why does
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6/6/11 Non-vascular plants tend to be quite small, why does
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6/6/11 Alternation of Generation
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6/6/11 Non-vascular plants tend to have flagellated sperm,
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6/6/11 Non-vascular plants tend to have flagellated sperm,
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6/6/11 Types of Non-Vascular Plants
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6/6/11 Liverworts Characteristics Have either a flattened (lobed) thallus or leafy thallus Each lobe of the thallus has: Rhizoids- root-like structures that project into the soil Gemmae- groups of cells that can detach from the thallus and start a new plant- ASEXUAL
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6/6/11 Following fertilization, a tiny sporophyte is composed of
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6/6/11 Liverwort, Marchantia ,
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6/6/11
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6/6/11 Mosses Characteristics Live in very diverse environments: Arctic, Temperate zones, Deserts, Forests: usually found as thick mats that cover the ground; consisting of rocks and rotting logs
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6/6/11 Forms of Reproduction Fragmentation Life Cycle: Gametophyte has two stages: algalike protonema, a branching filament of cells Favorable growing condition causes leafy shoots to grow upwards on the protonema Rhizoids anchor the shoots, bearing antheridia (produce flagellated sperm) or archegonia( has a single egg) Fertilization- dependent sporophyte
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6/6/11 Life Cycle for Mosses
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6/6/11 ECOLOGICAL SUCCESSION AND
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6/6/11 Oh No…….FOREST FIRE!
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Plant Kingdom - Transition from Water to Land: 6/6/11...

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