Classification and Domains

Classification and Domains - Taxonomy Classification...

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6/6/11 Taxonomy & Classification Taxonomy - science of identifying and classifying organisms; all about the naming Classification - systematic grouping and naming of organisms based on shared similarities
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6/6/11 History of
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6/6/11 4th century B.C. The Age of Aristotle No modern technology 2 Divisions Plants (immobile) edible vs. inedible Animals (mobile) blood vs. bloodless walking vs. flying vs. swimming Used up through 1600s
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6/6/11 1500s to 1600s The Age of Exploration Extensive travel to New World Push to collect/classify as many specimens as possible; many newly discovered organisms “free for all”- long descriptive names, “folk taxonomy”, duplicate names for same organism, one organism with 2 names, etc. Tomato- Solanum caule inermi
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6/6/11 1700s:The Age of Carolus Linnaeus (born Carl von Linne) “Father of Modern Biological Classification” Standardized classification Binomial nomenclature ( Genus species) Hierarchy: Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Family, Genus, Species
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6/6/11 1700s:The Age of Carolus Linnaeus (born Carl von Linne) Based on phenetics shared physical characteristics Not evolutionary relationships, fossils, embryology or behavior
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6/6/11 1700s-1800s: The Age of Microscopy Great advances in microscopes Ernst Haeckel adds 3rd Kingdom Protista 3 Kingdoms include: Protista (single-celled eukaryotes and prokaryotes) Plantae
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6/6/11 Classification must reflect
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