Exercise_2_bacteria_and_protists

Exercise_2_bacteria_and_protists - Exercise 2 Bacteria and...

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Exercise 2 Bacteria and Protists
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How do prokaryotes and eukaryotes compare?
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Prokaryotes vs. Eukaryotes Prokaryotes Domain: Bacteria or Archaea Lack membrane bound nuclei Lack membrane bound organelles Cell Wall: Peptidoglycan Cellular structure: unicelluar Eukaryotes Domain: Eukarya Contain membrane bound nucleus Contain membrane bound organelles Cellular structure: Uni- and multi- cellular Kingdoms: Protist, Fungi, Plant, Animal
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Why bother studying bacteria and other types of single celled eukaryotes?
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BACTERIA (MICROBES)EXIST EVERYWHERE
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Some bacteria cause disease. Klebsiella pneumoniae (5,821X)
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Microbes (Fungi) synthesize antibiotics to protect themselves from bacteria
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Some bacteria recycle organic and inorganic atoms for use. Decomposers
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Bacteria are decomposers.
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The Carbon Cycle
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The Nitrogen Cycle
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The Sulfur Cycle
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Bacteria help make food.
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Fermentation Pathways
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Bacteria can help function in digestion.
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DECONTAMINATE WASTES
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Flasks of pig wastewater show what a difference 12 hours of treatment can make. 675 parts per million nitrogen in the dark untreated flask versus less than 24 parts per million in the clear treated flask.
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Microbes are useful in research. Simple structures. Large numbers give statistically reliable results at a reasonable cost. Reproduce quickly Excellent for genetic studies.
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Bacterial Cell Organization
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Structure of Bacteria
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THE MOST COMMON BACTERIAL SHAPES
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Asexual reproduction and Cellular arrangement
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Cellular divisions Prokaryotes: Binary Fission
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Predict how the following bacterial arrangements might have occurred.
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Neisseria (22,578X): causes the bacterial infection, Gonorrhea
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Streptococcus (9605X)
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Merismopedia (100X): a cyanobacteria
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Bacillus megaterum (10,000X)
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Slime Layer: Bacteria growing on tooth enamel
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Exercise_2_bacteria_and_protists - Exercise 2 Bacteria and...

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