kingdom fungi - Transition from Water to Land Kingdom Fungi...

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Unformatted text preview: Transition from Water to Land Kingdom Fungi The Origin of Fungi Phylogenetic systematics suggests: Fungi descended from an aquatic organism Fungi evolved from a flagellated ancestor (although fungi today have no flagella) The ancestor was unicellular Figure 27.9 Choanoflagellida (clade) Contain flagella and a body type similar to a characteristic type of sponge cell. Some systematists place these organisms in the animal and fungi kingdom. A colonial choanoflagellate Present-Day Fungi Characteristics of Fungi Fungi, studied in the field of mycology, are heterotrophs many are saprophytes that digest dead organic matter and wastes Some are parasites that obtain nutrients from the tissues of other organisms Multicellular Molds and mushrooms Unicellular Yeasts Saprotrophs : secrete digestive enzymes called, exoenzymes, into the surrounding environment to decompose complex molecules needed for nutrition. Morphology of Multi-cellular Eukaryotic Fungi Structural Components of Fungi Thallus: The body of a fungus consists of a mycelium Mycelium: a loosely organized mass of threadlike structures called hyphae release enzymes that digest substratum Increased surface area for absorption Cell walls contain chitin a polysaccharide also found in the exoskeletons of arthropods Hypha Hypha are composed of tubular cell walls surrounding the plasma membrane and the cytoplasm of the cells. Hypha, in most Fungi, is divided by cross-walls called, Septa . Septa have pores which allow for ribosomes, mitochondria, and nuclei to flow from cell to cell Coenocytic Hypha are those hyphae lacking septa. Repeated division of nuclei without cytoplasmic division Specialized Hypha Haustoria- penetrate the tissue of their The mycelium of a typical fungus. The mold Aspergillus niger consists of filamentous hyphae, the cells of which can be multinucleate and separated by pore- containing septa. Comparison: Septate v. Nonseptate Hypha Fungi propagate themselves by producing a vast number of spores, either sexually or asexually. Why is this an adaptive advantage for reproduction? Why is this an adaptive advantage for reproduction?...
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This note was uploaded on 06/06/2011 for the course BIO 1201 taught by Professor N.haque during the Spring '09 term at CUNY City Tech.

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kingdom fungi - Transition from Water to Land Kingdom Fungi...

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