TEACHER TENURE - 6/6/11 TEACHER TENURE...

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Click to edit Master subtitle  style  6/6/11 TEACHER  TENURE AD LDSP 752 SCHOOL LAW, SPRING 2011 STEVE KIRCHER
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 6/6/11 Teacher Tenure: Wisconsin’s Budget Repair Bill Nationwide Crisis
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 6/6/11 Introduction and Summary In 1983,  A Nation at Risk  was  published and since then  education reforms at all levels  have focused on improving  student performance and  reducing performance gaps
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 6/6/11 Introduction and Summary In 2001, the federal No Child Left Behind  Act was passed Mandated that all classrooms be staffed with a  “highly qualified teacher.” Focused on teacher recruitment, preparation,  compensation and distribution Very little focus on Teacher Tenure or 
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 6/6/11 Why we are advocating for  Political opposition has historically prevent  tenure reform efforts from advancing, but  opposition has decreased in recent years Student testing and data collection systems in  schools, districts and state levels has allowed  politicians and policymakers to link teacher  evaluations and tenure to student 
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 6/6/11 Why we are advocating for  Public concern over underperforming schools  has created new incentives for policymakers  to look at new approaches to teacher quality It’s time to improve the process by which new  teachers are granted continuing contracts
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 6/6/11 History of Teacher Tenure Tenure is widely misunderstood, but it  was intended to be a system in which  teachers who have successfully  completed a probationary period-usually  three years-can only be fired through a  long and complicated process as laid out  in state tenure law and local collective  bargaining contracts
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 6/6/11 History of Tenure Confusion comes from states using  different terms with different meanings Some states use “tenure” Some use “continuing contracts” Others use “permanent employment status” Some states have passed laws to end  tenure, but have created evaluation 
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 6/6/11 History of Tenure Tenure was developed in the early  1900s to protect teachers from  unfair dismissal Policies are set at state levels States can require/not require tenure Allow local school districts to make 
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 6/6/11 History of Tenure New Jersey enacted first K-12 tenure law in  1909 By 1940, about 70% of public school  teachers enjoyed some form of tenure Today, every state except Wisconsin requires  teachers receive some form of tenure
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 6/6/11 History of Tenure Typically, state statutes define the  criteria for teachers to be granted  tenure and how teachers can be  dismissed after earning it Statutes vary from state to state,  but most are similar
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This note was uploaded on 06/06/2011 for the course ADMIN LEAD ad ldsp 75 taught by Professor Burns during the Spring '11 term at Wisconsin Milwaukee.

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TEACHER TENURE - 6/6/11 TEACHER TENURE...

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