The Holocaust and Its Effects Today

The Holocaust and Its Effects Today - Holocaust 1 The...

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Holocaust 1 The Holocaust and Its Effects Today Stephanie Teal HIS204 American History Since 1865 Instructor: Dennis Magnuson February 21, 2011
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Holocaust 2 The question we will explore in this paper is the effects that the Holocaust had on its survivors, family members and how it still affects us today. There is still racism in our country and the Holocaust caused lasting images in the minds of the survivor of just how cruel people can be. Also, we will explore the idea that we could have another Holocaust today if the situation presents itself and how that would affect people today. The Holocaust was a tragic point in history that many people don’t believe ever happened. The survivors thought it should never have happened. Not only did this affect the people who lived through it; it also affected everyone who was connected to those fortunate individuals who survived. The survivors may have survived but there are times when their memories and flashbacks have made them wish they were the ones who died instead of living with the horrible memories of that time. “In 1933, the Jewish population of Europe stood at over nine million. Most European Jews lived in countries that Nazi Germany would occupy or influence during World War II . By 1945, the Germans and their collaborators killed nearly two out of every three European Jews as part of the " Final Solution ," the Nazi policy to murder the Jews of Europe. Although Jews, whom the Nazis deemed a priority danger to Germany, were the primary victims of Nazi racism, other victims included some 200,000 Roma (Gypsies). At least 200,000 mentally or physically disabled patients, mainly Germans, living in institutional settings, were murdered in the so-called Euthanasia Program . As Nazi tyranny spread across Europe, the Germans and their collaborators persecuted and murdered millions of other people. Between two and three million Soviet prisoners of war were
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Holocaust 3 murdered or died of starvation, disease, neglect, or maltreatment. The Germans targeted the non- Jewish Polish intelligentsia for killing, and deported millions of Polish and Soviet civilians for forced labor in Germany or in occupied Poland , where these individuals worked and often died under deplorable conditions. From the earliest years of the Nazi regime, German authorities persecuted homosexuals and others whose behavior did not match prescribed social norms. German police officials targeted thousands of political opponents (including Communists, Socialists, and trade unionists) and religious dissidents (such as Jehovah's Witnesses). Many of these individuals died as a result of incarceration and maltreatment.” (United States Holocaust Museum 2010) The question stated "Can prejudice and racism lead to another Holocaust?" Of course it can. History has repeated itself many times. If the world begins a campaign like Hitler for Anti- Semitism, this could lead to segregation between a certain race and the rest of the public. Once someone speaks the words cannot be taken back and they spread like wildfire, even if they are no
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The Holocaust and Its Effects Today - Holocaust 1 The...

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