THR2 - Click to edit Master subtitle style 6/9/11 Theatr e...

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Unformatted text preview: Click to edit Master subtitle style 6/9/11 Theatr e Exam 2 6/9/11 The Designer The visual and aural elements of design provide an audience with an understanding of time, place, mood, etc. Scenic Designer- Responsible for the stage set Designers make connections between symbols and ideas creating the world of the play in which the performers interact. They deal with practical and aesthetic concerns of the stage production 6/9/11 Scenic Design Today The architect of the room, the furniture, the color, the fabrics, the details- all work to create a unified whole that provides a sense of place, time, and mood How does this translate into stage environment? The designer must ask: questions of scale, performer relationship to space, specific choices of what inhabits the world of the play in regards to symbolic message as well as practical 6/9/11 Objectives of Stage Design Creating an environment for the performers and for the performance Helping to set the mood and style of the production Helping to distinguish realistic from nonrealistic theatre Est. the locale and period in which the play takes place Evolving a design concept in concert with the director and other designers Where appropriate, providing a central image or visual metaphor for the production Ensuring that the scenery is coordinated with other production elements and solving practical design problems 6/9/11 Aesthetic Aspects of Stage The creation of the physical spaces can establish mood, style, and meaning for the production Connections between scenic design and painting How do we determine focus in the visual environment? What does the play call for? Happy, sad, frightening, etc. How can the environment of the play create that sense of emotion? 6/9/11 Realistic and Nonr ealistic Realistic Theatre; Settings that resemble the real life counterpart (traditional western theatre) Nonrealistic Theatre; uses imagination and symbol to evoke meaning and spatial ideas (traditional eastern performance) Regardless of the style, the designer must indicate locale, period, and sense of the play 6/9/11 The Design Concept A unifying idea carried out visually Important when shifting the play in time and place- allows audience to know when/where the story occurs (this happens most often with Shakespearean and Greek works) Establishes central image or metaphor Provides the means to coordinate the whole design- all the design elements The design concept must be unified with the directors concept to insure that the audience receives the same message in the production 6/9/11 Stage Design and Popular Crossover Potentials for scenic designs Film, television, rock concerts, theme parks, Las Vegas The lines between pure theatre design and scenic design. 6/9/11 Pr actical Aspects of Scene Stage design is determined by the physical space of performance The scenic designer develops a ground plan that lays out the location of walls, furniture, etc from a birds eye view of the stage Space is determined differently by the types of stage spaces 6/9/11...
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THR2 - Click to edit Master subtitle style 6/9/11 Theatr e...

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