Phil12_S11_midterm_sample

Phil12_S11_midterm_sample - Phil 12: Logic and Decision...

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Directions and Sample Questions for Midterm Exam I. Argumentation A. Basic concepts: Select the best answer to the following multiple-choice questions. 1. Which of the following could be a counterexample to a definition of “cat” a. an example that shows that cats have surprising new properties b. a duck that satisfies the sufficient conditions for being a cat c. an dog that satisfies the necessary conditions for being a cat. d. a cat that does not satisfy one set of sufficient conditions for being a cat 2. Which of the following statements is a tautology? a. Dogs have four legs. b. Dogs do not like cats. c. If something barks, then it is a dog. d. Only animals are dogs. 3. An argument is a. a conflict between two or more individuals b. a discourse designed to convince someone to accept a conclusion c. a set of statements, some of which are offered to justify others d. none of the above 4. Which of the following is an example of an invalid statement? a. An even number is an integer divisible evenly by 2. b. The longest day of the year is in June. c. Can you help me with this? d. None of the above 5. In the statement “The dog won’t bite unless you threaten,” “the dog bites” is a. a necessary condition for you threatening b. neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for you threatening c. a sufficient condition for you threatening d. both a necessary and a sufficient condition for you threatening 6. Which of the following is not a conclusion indicator? a. therefore b. since c. thus d. proves that 7. In a valid argument with a false conclusion a. all the premises must be true b. at least one premise must be false c. the premises may be either true or false d. you cannot tell anything about the truth of the premises B. Conditionals: Select the best answer to the following multiple-choice questions. 8. The statement “If there is a storm, we will get wet” is false when: a. There is not a storm and we get wet. b. There is a storm and we get wet.
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This note was uploaded on 06/07/2011 for the course PHIL 101 taught by Professor Brown during the Spring '08 term at San Diego.

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Phil12_S11_midterm_sample - Phil 12: Logic and Decision...

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