Lecture_25

Lecture_25 - PHIL 4: Introduction to Ethics Out of t e...

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Unformatted text preview: PHIL 4: Introduction to Ethics Out of t e crooked T mber of humani no s aight t ing was ever made . Immanuel Kan 1 Kant ( IV ) From Last Time Acting according to duty but with ulterior motives or out of immediate inclination has no moral worth because such motives are unreliabl e , produce the right act only by luc k , and have no moral conten t Discussion of mixed motives : we concluded that either the straightforward reading of Kant needs to be amended or we are left with a grim view of moral worth. ( Perhaps Kant should never have brought it up the subject of good will! ) Hypothetical imperatives: 1. Rules of Ski $ 2. Counsels of Prudenc e 3 Since in early childhood we dont know what purposes we may come to have in the course of our life, parents try above all...to provide [their children with] skill in the use of means to any chosen end. For any given end, the parents cant tell whether it will actually come to be a purpose that their child actually has, but they have to allow that some day it may [be an end for the child]. They are so focused on this that they commonly neglect to form and correct their childrens judgment about the worthwhileness of the things that they may make their ends. 4 If only it were as easy to give a definite concept of happiness, the [counsels of] prudence would perfectly correspond to those of skill...For then we could say that, with prudence as with skill, whoever wills the end wills also...the only means to it that are in his power. Unfortunately, however, the concept of happiness is so indefinite that, although each person wishes to attain it, he can never give a definite and self-consistent account of what it is that he wishes and wills under the heading of wanting happiness...So in his pursuit of happiness he cant be guided by detailed principles but only by bits of empirical advice (e.g. concerning diet, frugality, courtesy, restraint, etc.) which experience shows to be usually conducive to well-being....
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Lecture_25 - PHIL 4: Introduction to Ethics Out of t e...

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