Online_Lecture_21

Online_Lecture_21 - PHIL 4: Introduction to Ethics Out of t...

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Unformatted text preview: PHIL 4: Introduction to Ethics Out of t e crooked T mber of humani no s aight t ing was ever made . Immanuel Kan 1 John Stuart Mills On Liberty ( III ) Can Mill Consistently Endorse HP? Lets go back to what we said earlier about harm. We decided that harm is a w rongful setback of your interests But our concept of w rongful involved the violation of moral rights. What exactly is a moral right? And can a utilitarian believe in rights? ( Some in this class have already voiced their suspicion here ) Can Mill Consistently Endorse HP? Lets go back to what we said earlier about harm. We decided that harm is a w rongful setback of your interests But our concept of w rongful involved the violation of moral rights. What exactly is a moral right? And can a utilitarian believe in rights? ( Some in this class have already voiced their suspicion here ) This question warrants a brief detour Moral Rights We hold these truths to be self- evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Lets take the Frst of these as our example: the right to life ( or put negatively, the right not to be killed ) What do you think this means ? Doesnt it roughly mean that killing you would be wrong even if that produced the best consequences ? Mill and Moral Rights Imagine the innocent man in Angry- Mob saying to the sheri f , I have a right not to be killed! Do you think it makes sense for the sheri f to respond, Yes, that is true. But in this case it is not wrong to kill you because of the good consequences? Utilitarianism seems to have no room for rights: if the right not to be killed could be overridden whenever it had the best consequences, then it doesnt really seem to be a righ t On the other hand, if the right not to be killed overrides the good consequences of killing you, then utilitarianism has been abandoned A Puzzle About On Liberty In his essay On Liberty , Mill advocates strongly for the Harm...
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Online_Lecture_21 - PHIL 4: Introduction to Ethics Out of t...

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