Musicpaper - Shelby L Smith EH 102 Mr Kennedy Face the Music The year is 1996 as eager children file past a noisy closed-off room with looks of

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Shelby L. Smith 10-13-10 EH 102 Mr. Kennedy Face the Music The year is 1996 as eager children file past a noisy, closed-off room with looks of anticipation. As the doors open, the kindergarten class rushes in to find just the right seat, though none actually sit down. These children know the joy of this room; these children know the joy of music. In the late 1990’s, there was no question as to whether music would be part of the curriculum for every elementary school across the United States, but now things are changing. In the past twelve years, the view of music education has changed drastically. By the time this kindergarten class graduated in May 2010, the music once so loved had deteriorated from one hour twice a week to a fifteen-minute class once every Monday (Interview with Morgan). Unfortunately, this is not a story of fiction, but one of hard, cold facts. With schools across the nation facing drastic budget cuts, public school music programs were first to hit the “chopping block” of funds cut. This is a very shortsighted plan to fix the budget because, although some money is saved, the lessons taught in early music classes are long lost. The question of what exactly one can gain from music is a very broad inquiry indeed, but there are a few basic lessons that are proven to be best gained through music. Music education causes children to develop exceptional linguistic, analytical, and creative thinking skills, which can lead to the children’s ability to solve a wide range of problems.
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One of the first benefits of music is the excellent aid it provides to the development of linguistic skills. Linguistics is defined as “anything relating to language and the understanding thereof (Define)”. Music aids in the development of this area by forcing students to spend more time thinking about not only the meaning of the words they are speaking, but also how each word is formed and the spacing of consonants and vowels (Milavanov Para. 2). One study shows that, compared to non-musicians, those who had had early music training of some sort had a higher amount of grey matter in the area of the brain that deals with speech and motor control (Kraus Para. 4). Music training and linguistics are very much like physical exercise the body. Although a person could live without exercise, the muscles and bones would not develop properly and would inevitably hold the person back from full potential.
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This note was uploaded on 06/07/2011 for the course EH 101 taught by Professor Mr.joeykennedy during the Fall '10 term at University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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Musicpaper - Shelby L Smith EH 102 Mr Kennedy Face the Music The year is 1996 as eager children file past a noisy closed-off room with looks of

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