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Diamond - Diamond Diamonds form between 120-200 kms or...

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Diamond Diamonds form between 120-200 kms or 75-120 miles below the earth's surface. According to geologists the first delivery of diamonds was somewhere around 2.5 billion years ago and the most recent was 45 million years ago. The carbon that makes diamonds comes from the melting of pre-existing rocks in the Earth's upper mantle. Diamond deposits are called Kimberlite Pipes or Blue Ground. These are also called Primary Mines . On the other hand, diamonds are also found at river beds. These are Alluvial Deposits . Mother Nature has to toil for millions of years to make a diamond. A diamond comes from the bosom of the earth. More interestingly not all the diamonds mined are made into jewelry. Only one fourth quantity that is mined is made into jewelry. Every 100 tons of mud produces one carat of a diamond. It could be anything from 0.005 ct to 1 ct. Coal is formed from terrestrial plant debris and the oldest land plants are younger than almost every diamond that has ever been dated, it is easy to conclude that coal did not play a significant role in the formation of Earth's diamonds. Coal does not become diamond anywhere in nature. This article really made me curious about diamond when I saw the question “Diamond from Coal?” on the title of the article. Every women in the earth love diamond, but I never thought diamond is one of the form of coal. However, when I was researching about it, a lot of people believed in that diamond is the form of Coal. In the article carbon is that make diamond, and by researching it was really
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