PlutarchLifeofTiberiusGracchus.pdf - Plutarch u2022 Life...

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10/25/2014Plutarch • Life of Tiberius Gracchus*.html1/24mail: Bill ThayerἙλληνικήItalianoHelpUpHomeGreek Parallels: Agis and CleomenesThis webpage reproduces one of The Parallel Lives by Plutarch published in Vol. X of the Loeb Classical Library edition, 1921The text is in the public domain.This page has been carefully proofread and I believe it to be free of errors. If you find a mistake though, please let me know!Plutarch, The Parallel LivesThe Life of Tiberius Gracchus11Now that we have duly finished the first part of our story, wehave to contemplate fates no less tragic than those of Agis andCleomenes in the lives of the Roman couple, Tiberius and Caius,which we set in parallel. They were sons of Tiberius Gracchus,who, although he had been censor at Rome, twice consul, and hadcelebrated two triumphs, derived his more illustrious dignity fromhis virtue. 2Therefore, after the death1of the Scipio whoconquered Hannibal, although Tiberius had not been his friend,but actually at variance with him, he was judged worthy to takeScipio's daughter Cornelia in marriage. We are told, moreover,that he once caught a pair of serpents on his bed, and that the(Vol. X)p145
10/25/2014Plutarch • Life of Tiberius Gracchus*.html2/24soothsayers, after considering the prodigy, forbade him to kill bothserpents or to let both go, but to decide the fate of one or the otherof them, declaring also that the male serpent, if killed, would bringdeath to Tiberius, and the female, to Cornelia. 3Tiberius,accordingly, who loved his wife, and thought that since she wasstill young and he was older it was more fitting that he should die,killed the male serpent, but let the female go. A short timeafterwards, as the story goes, he died,2leaving Cornelia withtwelve children by him.4Cornelia took charge of the children and of the estate, andshowed herself so discreet, so good a mother, and somagnanimous, that Tiberius was thought to have been made nobad decision when he elected to die instead of such a woman. Forwhen Ptolemy3the king offered to share his crown with her andsought her hand in marriage, she refused him, and remained awidow. 5In this state she lost most of her children, but threesurvived; one daughter, who married Scipio the younger, and twosons, Tiberius and Caius, whose lives I now relate. These sonsCornelia reared with such scrupulous care that althoughconfessedly no other Romans were so well endowed by nature,they were thought to owe their virtues more to education than tonature.21Now, just as, in spite of the likeness between Castor and Polluxas they are represented in sculpture and painting, there is a certaindifference of shape between the boxer and the runner, so in thecase of these young Romans, along with their strong resemblanceto one another in bravery and self-command, as well as in

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