ch02_CE - Guide to Networking Essentials Fifth Edition...

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Guide to Networking Essentials Fifth Edition Chapter 2 Network Design Essentials
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Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 2 Objectives Explain the basics of a network layout Describe the standard networking topologies Explain the variations on standard networking topologies Describe the role of hubs and switches in a network topology Construct a basic network layout
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Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 3 Examining the Basics of a Network Layout To implement a network, you must first decide how to best situate the components in a topology Topology refers to the physical layout of its computers, cables, and other resources, and also to how those components communicate with each other The arrangement of cabling is the physical topology The path that data travels between computers on a network is the logical topology Topology has a significant effect on the network’s performance and growth, and equipment decisions
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Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 4 Understanding Standard Topologies Networks are based on three physical topologies A bus consists of a series of computers connected along a single cable segment Computers connected via a central concentration point (hub) are arranged in a star topology Computers connected to form a loop create a ring Physical topologies describe cable arrangement How the data travels along those cables might represent a different logical topology The logical topologies that dominate LANs include bus, ring, and switching, all of which are usually implemented as a physical star
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Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 5 Physical Bus Topology Low fault tolerance
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Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 6 Signal Propagation Computers communicate by sending information across the media as a series of signals In a typical (copper wire) physical bus, those signals are sent as electrical pulses that travel along the length of the cable in all directions The signals continue to travel until they weaken enough so as not to be detectable or until they encounter a device that absorbs them This traveling across the medium is called signal propagation At the end of a cable, the signal bounces back
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Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 7 Signal Bounce
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Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 8 Cable Termination
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Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 9 Cable Failure
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Guide to Networking Essentials, Fifth Edition 10 Logical Bus Topology Logical topologies describe the path that data
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ch02_CE - Guide to Networking Essentials Fifth Edition...

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