HCA240_Final Project_Public Awareness

HCA240_Final Project_Public Awareness - HCA/ 240 Week 9...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
HCA/ 240 Week 9 Final Project: Public Awareness University of Phoenix Instructor: Kathalene Harris Due: Sunday, March 6, 2011
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Gestational Diabetes Gestational diabetes is a condition that is first recognized during pregnancy and is characterized by high blood sugar. Approximately 4% of all pregnancies are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Low blood sugar is prevented by hormones produced by the placenta during a woman's pregnancy (WebMD, Pregnancy and Gestational Diabetes: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment, Complications and Risks, 2005- 2011, p. 1 ) . The actions of insulin are stopped by these hormones. Gestational diabetes is the result of the pancreas's inability to produce enough insulin to overcome the effect of the increase hormones during pregnancy. I am going to describes gestational diabetes, its causes, and its features, and treatment as well as how to help control the condition. Additionally, I am going to discuss the existing gestational diabetes program in my town, along with my proposed improvement of the community- based education and awareness program. Gestational diabetes is a condition characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that is first recognized during pregnancy. The cause of gestational diabetes is almost all women have some degree of impaired glucose intolerance as a result of hormonal changes that occur during pregnancy. If a woman gets diabetes or high blood sugar when she is pregnant, but she never had it before, then she has gestational diabetes. Its medical name is gestational diabetes mellitus or GDM (Mayo Clinic, Gestational Diabetes, 1998-2011 ) . Gestational Diabetes is a kind of diabetes that only pregnant women get. In fact, the word gestational means “during pregnancy.” That means that their blood sugar may be higher than normal, but not high enough to have diabetes. Diabetes is a disease of metabolism, which is the way your body uses food for energy and growth. Your stomach and intestines break down much of the food you eat. After digestion, the glucose passes into your bloodstream, which is why glucose is also called blood sugar. Once in the blood, the glucose is ready for your body cells to use. When your
Background image of page 2
metabolism is normal, your body makes enough insulin to move all the glucose smoothly from your bloodstream into your cells (WebMD, 2005-2011, p. 3). If you have diabetes, your insulin and glucose levels are out of balance. Either your body isn’t making enough insulin, or your cells can’t use insulin the way they should. Without insulin, the glucose that can’t get into your cells builds up in your bloodstream. During the later part of pregnancy, these hormonal changes place pregnant woman at risk for gestational diabetes. During pregnancy, increased levels of certain hormones made in the placenta, the organ that connects the baby by the umbilical cord to the uterus help shift nutrients from the mother to the developing fetus. Other hormones are produced by the placenta to help prevent the mother from
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/08/2011 for the course HCA 240 taught by Professor Agnessamaniego during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

Page1 / 11

HCA240_Final Project_Public Awareness - HCA/ 240 Week 9...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online