HCA240_Wk8 Assignment-Mental Illness Paper

HCA240_Wk8 Assignment-Mental Illness Paper - Generalized...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Generalized Anxiety Disorder HCA/240 Week 8 Assignment: Mental Illness Paper Due: Sunday, February 27, 2011
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) is much more than the normal anxiety people experience day to day. It's chronic and exaggerated worry and tension, even though nothing seems to provoke it. Having this disorder means always anticipating disaster, often worrying excessively about health, money, family, or work. Sometimes, though, the source of the worry is hard to pinpoint. Simply the thought of getting through the day provokes anxiety. People with generalized anxiety disorder can't seem to shake their concerns, even though they usually realize that their anxiety is more intense than the situation warrants. Generalized Anxiety Disorder has been distinguished from other anxiety disorders since 1980. It has been characterized as excessive worry for at least six months. GAD has been diagnosed in more and more people during the last 30 years. More research is still needed before its causes can be determined and treatment can be fine-tuned. In 1980, the American Psychiatric Association changed its classifications and separated anxiety neurosis into GAD, a chronic anxiety that is sustained for a long period of time, and panic disorder, intense anxiety presenting itself in spontaneous episodes (APA, 2010). There is limited information about GAD's history and much is still being learned about GAD, as there have not been many conclusive studies on GAD patients' responses to treatment. It is also nearly impossible to perform follow-up studies on any research done before 1980 because of the inability to determine the percentage of patients who had GAD but in the1980s it was determined that there was a 56 percent recovery rate for GAD, as well as the possibility for GAD to last decades, if not an entire lifetime. Current research is still attempting to separate GAD from panic disorder (Slade & Andrews, 2001). Additionally, there are misconceptions of anxiety disorder including GAD, like anxiety disorders are not common, there is only one basic type of anxiety disorder, anxiety disorder is only caused by genetics, anxiety disorder is the feeling of being scared and nothing else and anxiety
Background image of page 2
disorder has the same likelihood in women than in men (APA, 2010). Furthermore, there are myths regarding GAD, for instance anxiety disorders are not so common, which in fact almost 19 million Americans have an anxiety disorder, thus proving that any anxiety disorder is a huge pest that can destroy human health. Another, i n real sense, anxiety disorders are not true illnesses or diseases, which in fact just like diabetes, anxiety disorders are true, severe medical conditions that may have emerged from various reasons and factors like your genes, upsetting events and even ones that makeup your
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 06/08/2011 for the course HCA 240 taught by Professor Agnessamaniego during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

Page1 / 7

HCA240_Wk8 Assignment-Mental Illness Paper - Generalized...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online