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Grantwriting Tips - Grantwriting Tips...

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Grantwriting Tips http://lone-eagles.com/granthelp.htm Many Community Grant Templates are at http://lone-eagles.com/rural-grant-templates.htm to be shared without restriction. Writing grant proposals to get money to make your project happen is becoming more and more common. Here are tips and resources for writing your first grant! 1. Find out which foundations have given grants in your region similar to your planned proposal! Talk to those who got funded and ask for advice and ideally copies of their successful grants. 2. Read the current guidelines for those foundations on what they will fund and when the grants are due. If a foundation says they won‟t fund equipment, don‟t ask them for equipment (unless it‟s a necessary component of the part of the grant they said they‟d fund!) For example: A progra mmatic grant could ask for $50,000 in support equipment, but would not be considered if they called themselves a technology project. Semantics do matter a great deal! If they say they‟ll fund up to $15,000, don‟t ask them for $50,000. Foundations often shift their focus, and timing can be very important. Watch for timing- sensitive opportunities. Do your homework! Grant reviewers appreciate those who paid attention to their RFP‟s (Requests for Proposals.) Too few do! 3. Collect sample successful grants to use as boilerplate models. Many foundations will send you, on request, proposals from past funded projects, or at least will give you the addresses of past grant recipients, so you can ask them directly for copies of successful proposals. The more good proposals you read, the more you‟ll understand how clear writing and following guidelines leads to funding. 4. Use the same terms in your proposal that the foundation used to describe what they want to fund. Buzz phrases push important buttons. If they tell you what to tell them: listen, and be convincing as to how your project dovetails with their posted guidelines. If an RFP says they don‟t fund technology grants, don‟t use the word technology. Find other words to express your project, ideally taken directly from the RFP guidelines.
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5. Get to know individuals who have worked with the foundations to which you’re applying. Talk to foundation personnel as much as is politely possible. Typically, little suggestions, and hints, you‟ll pick up, even from a phone conversation, will make major differences in the final form and focus of your proposal. The more personal contacts you make, the better for you. Foundations appreciate those who take the time to gather all the facts, and they might even recognize your name when your proposal comes up for review. Pay careful attention on what to emphasize and what to tone down. 6. Less is More! Reviewing stacks of proposals is a difficult job. Grant reviewers quickly learn to scan text, particularly proposal abstracts, in an attempt to get a quick overview of exactly what you expect to do, with whom, when, how, and toward what measurable outcome. If you are short and to the point, and you‟ve
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