Lab assignment 3 - A Mode Median Mean Standard...

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Unformatted text preview: A Mode Median Mean Standard Deviation(biased) Variance(Biased) Standard Deviation(unbiased) Variance(unbiased) 0 1 2 3 4 0 1 2 3 4 0 1 2 3 4 0 1 2 3 4 0 2 2 1.41 2 1.45 2.11 B C 3 3 2 4 2 2 1 1 1 1 3 3 5 5 5 5 2 2 6 6 2 3 3.1 1.67 2.79 1.71 2.94 A1 3 3 2 4 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5 1 3 3 1.64 2.7 1.69 2.84 0 2 4 6 8 0 2 4 6 8 0 2 4 6 8 0 2 4 6 8 0 4 4 2.83 8 5. I found that Multiplying by a constant increases the measures of central tendency geometrically, by the squarte of the constant for the variance, while adding by a constant increases the mean arithmetically, but does not effect the other measures. Multiplying a constant and then adding a constant effects the mean geometrically and arithmetically, but does not effect the other two differently than simply multiplying. B1 C1 6 6 4 8 4 4 2 2 2 2 6 6 10 10 10 10 4 4 12 12 4 6 6.2 3.34 11.16 tiplying by a the measures of eometrically, by constant for the ding by a the mean does not effect s. Multiplying a adding a e mean arithmetically, but other two ply multiplying. A2 B2 6 6 4 8 4 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 8 8 10 10 10 10 10 10 2 6 6 3.29 10.8 2 3 4 5 6 2 3 4 5 6 2 3 4 5 6 2 3 4 5 6 2 4 4 1.41 2 C2 A3 5 5 4 6 4 4 3 3 3 3 5 5 7 7 7 7 4 4 8 8 4 5 5.1 1.67 2.79 5 5 4 6 4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3 6 6 7 7 7 7 7 7 3 5 5 1.64 2.7 B3 2 8 4 8 6 6 8 10 10 6 2 6 4 4 6 4 8 4 10 4 2 8 4 8 6 12 8 12 10 12 2 12 4 6 6 6 8 14 10 14 2 6 6 8 6 8.2 2.83 3.34 8 11.16 Frequency Count(A) Frequency Count 6 4 2 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 C3 8 8 6 10 6 6 4 4 4 4 4 4 10 10 12 12 12 12 12 12 4 8 8 3.29 10.8 Bin Limits(A) Frequency Count 0 4 1 4 2 4 3 4 4 4 5 0 6 0 Bin Limits(B) Frequency 0 0 1 4 2 5 3 4 4 1 5 4 6 2 Frequency 6 5 4 3 Frequency 2 1 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 cy Frequency 4 5 6 7 Bin Limits C Frequency 0 0 1 6 2 3 3 2 4 3 5 6 6 0 Frequency Count C 7 6 5 4 Frequency 3 2 1 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A B C 0.56 0.59 0 0.63 0.33 0.16 0.28 0.95 0.3 0.77 D 0.7 0 0.48 0.57 0.31 0.07 0.45 0.6 0.77 0.57 3.34 3.6 3.71 3.47 3.43 3.18 3.34 3.43 3.97 3.19 0.25 3.45 3.31 3.99 3.45 3.62 3.85 3.7 3.52 3.89 3.77 0.18 1.5 1 Column C 0.5 0 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 5 4 3 Column F 2 1 0 3 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 0.65 0.32 0.08 0.19 0.82 0 0.11 0.16 0.43 0.7 3.15 3.7 3.09 3.98 3.47 3.3 3.72 3.22 3 3.76 0.27 0.39 0.83 0.77 0.21 0.73 0.74 0.7 0.05 0.5 3.44 3.63 3.58 3.01 3.45 3.33 3.09 3.94 3.89 3.86 0.94 6 4 Column I 2 0 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 7. The correlation is strong, because you can generate a pretty straight line between the two data sets. 8. If you multiply by 20 and add 12, the correlation would stay the same, because it would increase proportionally, but the correlation wouldn't change. 4.5 ...
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This note was uploaded on 06/09/2011 for the course PSY 418 taught by Professor Haley during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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