The Audition

The Audition - 1 The Audition Chris Kim Mrs. Rosario...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The Audition Chris Kim Mrs. Rosario sometimes thought that her daughter Julianne was dumb. Julianne was her only daughter, her only child, but Mrs. Rosario was not so blinded by love that the idea that Julianne might be stupid did not occasionally cross her mind. The girl’s father had died when she was eight, Mrs. Rosario had never remarried, and the girl and her mother lived affectionately and closely. When Julianne was a child, she had been responsive and lively, but as she grew into adolescence, as her body matured, her character changed, and some of the wonderful clarity of her spirit was lost. At sixteen she became lazy, and developed a stubborn indifference to the hazards and rewards of life. She was a beautiful girl with dark hair and a discreet and striking grace, but Mrs. Rosario sometimes thought sadly that there was a rather great discrepancy between Julianne’s looks and what went on behind it. Her face and her beauty were almost never matched by anything she had to say. She would sit for an hour on the edge of her bed, staring at nothing. “What are you thinking about?” Mrs. Rosario would ask; “what’s on your mind, Julianne?” Julianne’s answer was always the same. “Nothing. I don’t know. I wasn’t thinking about anything.” Mrs. Rosario worked as a secretary. They lived in a two-room walk-up over a delicatessen in Flushing, Queens. They were poor. Julianne, in her first two years at high school, had gotten decent grades, and Mrs. Rosario had hoped to get her a college scholarship, but in her third year Julianne’s grades slumped, and she barely passed into 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
the senior class. She didn’t seem to mind. She said she didn’t care. Mrs. Rosario gave up the idea of a scholarship and decided that Julianne should take practical trade courses after her senior year and go to work when she graduated. She made the decision regretfully but with a clear eye on the future, for Mrs. Rosario had no rich relatives or any other expectation of help beyond her own ability to work and save. She told Julianne her plans, early in the summer after school had closed. “I really didn’t want to go to college,” Julianne said. “Well I’m glad it isn’t too much of a disappointment, dear,” Mrs. Rosario said. “I’ll go over next week and see about enrolling you in the trade school over in Manhattan.” “I don’t want to” Julianne said firmly. “Why not, dear?” “It would be a waste of my time,” Julianne said. “What good would that do me? I’m going to be an actress. The trade school would be a waste of time. I’m going on the stage.” “When did you decide this?” “Oh, a long time ago,” Julianne said. Mrs. Rosario struggled to hold her temper. She felt that she had had more than her share of loneliness and hard work since her husband’s death, and to have these burdens increased with the worries of an indolent and stage-struck girl mad her feel desperate and tired. She waited until this feeling had passed. Then she began, patiently, to describe to
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 16

The Audition - 1 The Audition Chris Kim Mrs. Rosario...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online