The Pressing Comb - WRA- Cultural Artifact

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Lauren McGrier February 21, 2011 WRA-125 008
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The Pressing Comb: Success and Art As a child my most fond memory was getting my hair done. Every two weeks my mother and I would go to Virginia Farrell’s and wait about thirty minutes to get a shampoo, conditioner, blow-dry, press and style. I remember it taking forever because I had so much hair. From my head to my mid-back were dangling ponytails with elaborate barrettes. I dreaded getting my hair done because it took very long and because I was slightly tender- headed. (Tender- headed means when getting one’s hair styled it hurts the client). However seeing the results made me forget about the pain I endured because my hair was a piece of art. Getting my hair done now as a young woman means a time for me to relax and get away from home. For me, going to the hair salon is like going to an art gallery. There, I see many different styles such as natural wraps, braids, corn rolls, weaves, curls and many more. Regaining my thoughts I know that working at a hair salon is a gateway for a lot of women in my community to gain success and enjoy what they do. Because of this, I have decided to use a pressing comb as my cultural Artifact. It serves two purposes: it creates what society considers good hair and provides success for many African Americans. Even though the pressing comb helps create good hair for the Black community, perms help this idea as well. Revolutionized by Madame CJ walker, the pressing comb would become her greatest invention that lead to many Black women using this piece to achieve “good hair”. The pressing comb is a piece of metal with wide teeth. It is placed on a stove or heat to get hot. It is used to soften and or straighten the coarseness of African American hair. Hair in this race is a big topic. African Americans are frequently asked questions about their hair from different cultures. Some like to even touch it because the texture is very distinct. What makes it distinct is because the hair has a natural curl and sometimes is very hard to manage. Other
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Lauren McGrier February 21, 2011 WRA-125 008 cultures use the pressing comb as well but the Black community commonly uses it much more than others. Many African Americans use the pressing comb because they want to achieve good
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This note was uploaded on 06/09/2011 for the course WRITING 125 taught by Professor Robison during the Spring '11 term at Michigan State University.

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The Pressing Comb - WRA- Cultural Artifact

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