Physical Geography - Freeze-Thaw Weathering Also called...

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Freeze-Thaw Weathering Also called frost weathering (ice wedging) Water freezes and expands and can cause large pressures to be exerted on the walls and bottom of the crack, widening it and leading to a piece of rock breaking off. Effective in the upper-middle and lower-high latitudes Physical Weathering Physical weathering (aka mechanical weathering) fractures bedrock producing regolith Frost Action : water expands when it freezes, and fractures rock Dominant process in arctic and high-mountain environments Frost cracks rock because pore spaces of soil and rock freezes and thaws repeatedly. Physical Weathering Salt-crystal growth: In dry climates, water evaporates from sandstone pores, leaving salt crystals behind. Crystals grow and disintegrate rock grain by grain. Occurs in arid and semiarid regions not in humid climates because rainfall dissolves salt and carries them downward to ground water. This process carves out niches, shallow caves, rock arches in sandstones.
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This note was uploaded on 06/11/2011 for the course GEOGRAPHY 600-201010 taught by Professor Christopherpost during the Spring '10 term at Kent State.

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Physical Geography - Freeze-Thaw Weathering Also called...

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