How I became off white -...

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iopasdfghjklzxcvbnmrtyuiopasdfghjklzxcvb How I Became “Off-White” An Ethnographer 11/17/2009 Lauren Beth Beauchamp 2C Anthropology 101: 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Dr. Jones
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Beauchamp 2 | P a g e Lauren Beth Beauchamp 2C Anthropology 101: 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Dr. Jones Due Date: Thursday, November, 17, 2009 How I Became Off-White: An Ethnographer When I arrived at the University of Alabama at Birmingham in August of 2009, I was from a very small community. To put in perspective of how small my community is, in May 2009 I graduated with a class of fifty-seven students (the largest in the school’s five year history) in a high school that is in a community with no zip-code of it’s own, and only two gas stations and a volunteer fire department. Among those fifty-seven students there were no full African American students, and among the approximate 900 students in the entire Kindergarten-Senior High school only two were full African Americans. This is not to say I had no experience with “black” people. My parents moved my family many times throughout my childhood, and I had sometimes attended schools where the race of African Americans was as high as ninety-eight percent. However, I had spent my entire high school years at my alma mater and my entire life south of the northern Tennessee border. I never thought of black girls as completely different then I was. I never understood the racist comments made by my friend’s parents or even my friends, because when I was younger my Christian religion and constant interaction with black children always made them perfectly equal with me. So when I attended the required freshman reading discussion on the day before classes began, I had no problem starting a conversation with the attractive black girl next to me. We laughed and found many things in common. She quickly introduced me to a group of her friends, who all were also African American. As the semester
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Beauchamp 3 | P a g e progressed however, I have realized through many outings with my black friends that although we are very much equal, we are very different. Ebonics was a completely new concept for me in August 2009. The word was introduced to me in my Anthropology course, and I quickly researched it online. The term was coined in 1973 by Dr. Robert Williams who wrote a book two years later on the subject. I realize that at UAB my actual interaction and exposure to Ebonics is limited. However, I have learned quite a few new words that really surprise me. One conversation with my best friends really stands out
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This note was uploaded on 06/11/2011 for the course ANTH 101 taught by Professor Dr.sharynjones during the Fall '11 term at University of Alabama at Birmingham.

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How I became off white -...

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