Per10_over - Preview of Period 10 Electric Charge and Force...

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Preview of Period 10: Electric Charge and Force 10.1 Electric Charge and Forces What happens when you place a negatively charged rod near an object? How do charges cause objects to move? 10.2 Conductors, Insulators, and Separation of Charge How can you make a bulb light using a plastic rod and a soda can? How do Leyden jars store charge? 10.3 Storing Charge on Capacitors How do capacitors store charge? 10-1
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Electrical Charge Charge come in two types: negative and positive. Charges of opposite signs (one negative and one positive) attract one another Charges of the same sign (both positive or both negative) repel one another. Uncharged objects have equal amounts of positive and negative charge. The attraction or repulsion between charged objects with an excess of positive or negative charge results in an electrical force on the objects. 10-2 + + + - - -
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Electrical Charge, Continued The symbol for charge is Q The unit of charge is a coulomb (coul) How large is a coulomb? When you rub the rod with the foam, you place about one microcoulomb (10 -6 coul) of negative charge on the rod How do charges move? Negative charge (electrons) can move freely through electric conductors. Most metals are good electric conductors. Electric insulators prevent the flow of charges. Good insulators include glass, plastic, rubber, and dry air. 10-3
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Electrical Forces and the Four Fundamental Forces Fundamental Forces Gravitational Electromagnetic = Electrical + Magnetic Weak Nuclear Strong Nuclear Gravitational forces act between masses. Electrical forces act between charges. Magnetic forces act between moving charges. Compare the equations for gravitational and electrical force: Q 1 and Q 2 = charge on the objects (in coul) D = distance between objects (in meters) k = a constant = 8.99 x 10 9 N m 2 /coul 2 2 2 1 D Q Q k F elect = 2 2 1 D M M G F grav = 10-4
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Electrical Force Equation The strength of the electrical force decreases as the distance between the charged objects increases. In fact, the force decreases as the square of the distance between charged objects 0 50 100 150 200 250 0.00 0.18 0.28 0.38 0.48 0.58 0.68 0.78 Distance (in meters) Electrical Force (in newtons) The graph illustrates the relationship between force and distance squared.
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This note was uploaded on 06/11/2011 for the course PHYSICS 103 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '10 term at Ohio State.

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Per10_over - Preview of Period 10 Electric Charge and Force...

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