Act_6 - 6/13/05 Name _ Section _ Activity 6: Entropy and...

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6/13/05 1 Name _________________________ Section ___________________ Activity 6: Entropy and The Laws of Thermodynamics 6.1 Order, Disorder, and Entropy 1) Ordered and Disordered Systems a) Deal three cards from the deck on your table. Do the three cards have the same picture? If not, return the cards to the deck, shuffle, and deal three cards again. Repeat until you have dealt three cards with the same picture (an ordered set). How many disordered sets did you deal before dealing an ordered set? ________ b) If you continued dealing sets of three cards, which type of set would you expect to deal more frequently: ordered sets or disordered sets? _______________________ c) How can you relate your results with the cards to ordered and disordered systems in nature? Which would you think are more common – ordered systems or disordered systems? _________________ 2) Ordered and Disordered Checkers In the next activity, we use checkers on a four-square board to help explain why disordered systems are more common than ordered systems. To do this, we find the probability of drawing at random checkers whose colors match the colors of the squares on a four-square board. When you start the activity, the number of red and black checkers in the beaker is the same. Each time a checker is drawn from the beaker, we will act as if another checker of that color has been added to the beaker. That is, we will assume that before we draw each checker, there are equal numbers of red and black checkers in the beaker. a) Select one checker at random from the beaker. Place the selected checker on square #1 of the four-square board. Since there are two colors of checkers, what is the probability that the color of the checker you drew at random matches the color of square #1 on which it was placed? b) Draw a second checker at random from the beaker and place it on square #2. What is the probability that the color of the second checker you drew matches the color of square #2? c) What is the probability that the colors of both of the checkers you have drawn at random match the colors of the squares on which each was placed?
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6/13/05 2 d) Draw two more checkers at random, placing the first checker on square #3 and the second checker on square #4. What is the probability that the colors of all four checkers match the colors of the squares on which they were placed? 3) Combinations of Two Colors on Four Squares You can verify your results from part 2) using the 16 four-square boxes shown below. a) Fill in all possible arrangements of checkers by writing an R for a red checker and B for a black. The first box in each row has been filled in for you. R
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This note was uploaded on 06/11/2011 for the course PHYSICS 104 taught by Professor Staff during the Winter '11 term at Ohio State.

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Act_6 - 6/13/05 Name _ Section _ Activity 6: Entropy and...

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