day9extra - More Detail on the Minimax Principle Using...

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More Detail on the Minimax Principle Using tic-tac-toe as an example, we can further illustrate the concept behind the minimax principle. The search space (the solution tree) for a game like chess is impossible to search completely during play so partial searches around the current position (state) must be used. While the search space for tic-tac-toe is not as prohibitive in size, we will apply the minimax principle to this game for illustration purposes. The minimax principle is a heuristic approach. This heuristic does not allow one to be certain of winning whenever a win is possible, but it does find a move that may reasonably be expected to be among the best moves possible, given some starting position and limiting the search space. Exploration of the search space is typically stopped before terminal positions are reached, using any number of criteria. The positions where the search is stopped are then evaluated heuristically. What is needed is some sort of static evaluation function that attributes a value to each possible position.
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day9extra - More Detail on the Minimax Principle Using...

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