122ch13e - 46 13.65) Colligative properties depend on the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
46 13.65) Colligative properties depend on the concentration of particles in solution. P A = X A A , ) P = X solute solvent , ) T f = i K f m , ) T b = i K b m , A = i M R T In the last 3 equations, the “ i ” is the number of particles in the formula for the substance. i = # solute particles in solution - integer for ideal behavior i = 1 for a non-dissociating or non-ionizing compound (nonelectrolyte) = # particles (ions) resulting from the formula unit a) A 0.10 m aqueous NaCl solution has a higher boiling point than a 0.10 m aqueous C 6 H 12 O 6 solution. This is because the NaCl is ionic and when put in H 2 O it dissociates (comes apart) to form ions. It forms 2 ions, Na + and Cl , for every NaCl. Thus, 0.10 moles of NaCl will give 0.20 moles of ions (particles) in solution. The C 6 H 12 O 6 is a molecular non-ionizing solute and stays together as a single particle when it dissolves (as most, but not all, molecular substances do). So 0.10 moles of C 6 H 12 O 6 will give 0.10 moles of solute particles in solution. The boiling point elevation of a solution is directly related to the total moles of dissolved particles (b.p. increases). The NaCl solution will have a higher b.p. since its concentration of particles is greater than that of the C 6 H 12 O 6 Ideally, the 0.10 m NaCl solution should have twice the effect as the 0.10 m C 6 H 12 O 6 solution (the b.p. elevation should be twice as great).
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
47 13.65) (cont.)
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 12

122ch13e - 46 13.65) Colligative properties depend on the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online