Bio Lab Final - Osmosis Lab, Observing Osmosis in...

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Osmosis Lab, Observing Osmosis in Artificial Cells Completed By: Megan Sturza Lab Section: 917 Conducted on September 23rd, 2010 Abstract
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The objective of this experiment was to test how concentration gradient affects the rate of osmosis. This experiment was conducted by filling five bags of dialysis tubing with different concentrations of sucrose and placing them in beakers with varying solutions. The overall result was cells with the greatest difference in concentration either within the cell or in its environment will show the greatest gain or loss in weight. For this experiment, the results fit the expectation that a cell will gain water when placed in a solution with a lower concentration of solute and lose water when placed in a solution with a higher concentration of solute. Introduction The purpose of this lab experiment was to observe how properties of the cell membrane affect osmosis—the passive movement of water from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower concentration (Campbell, 2008). There are two processes by which materials may move into, out of, or within organisms, one being osmosis and the other diffusion or the method by which a solute passively moves from an area of higher concentration to an area of lower con- centration (Campbell, 2008). The two differ based on what each process transfers across the membrane, such as a solute during diffusion and water during osmosis. In this particular report, the main focus will be on the process of osmosis. For osmosis to occur, a concentration gradient and differentially permeable membrane are required. Concentration gradient refers to the difference in concentration between two areas and a differentially permeable membrane is one that is impermeable to a solute, but permeable to water (Campbell, 2008). Since osmosis does not depend on energy from living organisms, its rate is affected by temperature, particle size, and the concentration gradient. In the experiment conducted, the rate of osmosis was affected by the concentration gradient because different solute concentrations existed both outside each cell and within them making the gradient the
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variable, while temperature and particle size were controls. Other factors, such as the floppiness of the bags or cells themselves also varied from cell to cell and influenced how much room each cell had to gain or lose water. The relationship between concentrations outside of a cell and inside of a cell during os-
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This note was uploaded on 06/12/2011 for the course BIO 120 taught by Professor Throgerson during the Fall '08 term at Grand Valley State University.

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Bio Lab Final - Osmosis Lab, Observing Osmosis in...

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