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Unformatted text preview: 10/19/10 Public
Rela-ons
in
Government
 Government
Rela-ons
 Public
Rela-ons
in
Government
 •  GilleEe
Amendment
 –  Enacted
in
1913
 –  “Appropriated
funds
may
not
be
used
to
pay
a
 publicity
expert
unless
specifically
appropriated
 for
that
purpose.”
 –  Later
amended
to
note
that
no
government
 employee
may
be
employed
in
the
“prac-ce
of
 public
rela-ons”
 •  Today
there
are
close
to
4,000
full‐-me
 journalists
covering
the
capital
 •  News
coverage
24/7
 •  Need
for
media
rela-ons/public
rela-ons
 Public
Rela-ons
in
Government
 •  The
“gag
law”
 
“using
any
part
of
an
appropria-on
for
 services,
messages
or
publica-on
designed
to
 influence
any
member
of
Congress
in
his
 aTtude
toward
legisla-on
or
appropria-ons.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 –  Public
Affairs
yes,
Public
Rela-ons
no
 The
Na-onal
Associa-on
of
Government
 Communicators
 •  •  •  •  •  Public
Affairs
 Informa-on
Officers
 Press
Secretaries
 Communica-on
Specialists
 Communica-ons
 •  Professional
network
of
federal,
state
and
 local
government
employees
who
disseminate
 informa-on
within
and
outside
the
 government
 •  Writers,
graphic
ar-sts,
video
professionals,
 broadcasters,
photographers,
and
 spokespersons
 •  Members
?
 1 10/19/10 The
Na-onal
Associa-on
of
Government
 Communicators
 •  Women
dominate
the
profession
–
2/3rds
 •  Key
ac-vi-es
 –  Producing
web
content
 –  Holding
media
events
 –  Educa-onal/Professional
Development
 –  Development
of
news
releases
 The
Press
Secretary
 •  •  •  •  Senior
official,
one
step
below
cabinet
level
 Primary
spokesperson
for
the
administra-on
 Media
rela-ons
 $170,000
per
year
 •  Wri-ng
 •  Edi-ng
 •  draaing
 The
Press
Secretary
 Robert
Gibbs


 •  The
presiden-al
press
secretary
is
the
chief
 public
rela-ons
person
for
the
administra-on
 •  Communica-ng
the
policies
and
prac-ces
to
 the
public
with
increasing
responsibili-es
 •  High
public
profile
 •  Most
come
from
public
rela-ons
careers,
 rather
than
journalism
careers
 The
Press
Secretary
 •  White
House
press
secretary
–
“iconic
 posi-on”
 •  Robert
Gibbs
 –  North
Carolina
State
–
poli-cal
science
degree
 –  2004
John
Kerry’s
press
secretary
 –  Joined
Obama’s
2004
campaign
staff
 –  2008
Elec-on
–
Obama’s
communica-on
chief
 2 10/19/10 Lobbying
 Defined
–
 
A
“lobbyist”
is
an
individual
who
is
paid
by
a
 third
party
to
make
more
than
one
“lobbying
 contact,”
defined
as
an
oral
or
wriEen
 communica-on
to
a
vast
range
of
specific
 individuals
in
the
execu-ve
and
legisla-ve
 branches
of
the
federal
government.

 Lobbyists
 The
essence
of
a

 lobbyist’s
job
is
to

 inform
and
persuade.
 •  Fact‐finding
 •  Interpreta-on

 –  Government
ac-ons
 –  Company
ac-ons
 •  Advocacy
 •  Publicity
 •  Support
sales
 Lobbying
 Lobbying
is
“Big
Business”
 •  35,000
registered
lobbyists
 •  $2
billion
per
year
–
Federal
Government
 Poli-cal
Ac-on
CommiEee
 •  A
commiEee
formed
by
business,
labor,
or
 other
special
interest
groups
to
raise
money
 and
make
contribu-ons
to
the
campaigns
of
 poli-cal
candidates
whom
they
support
 3 10/19/10 PAC
 
Poli-cal
Ac-on
CommiEee
(PAC)
—
A
popular
 term
for
a
poli-cal
commiEee
organized
for
 the
purpose
of
raising
and
spending
money
to
 elect
and
defeat
candidates.

 Poli-cal
Ac-on
CommiEees
 •  A
PAC
contribu-on
‐
$10,000
per
elec-on
 
 
$5,000
primary
‐
$5,000
general
 •  PACs
represent
businesses,
industry
groups,
 unions,
professionals,
church
groups,
any
 group
of
people
 •  Corporate
PACs
get
their
money
from
 employees
and
stockholders
 Poli-cal
Ac-on
CommiEees
 A
PAC
is
a
group
of
people
who
raise
at

 least
$1,000
in
connec-on
with
a
federal

 elec-on.
 Top
PAC
Contributors
2009‐2010
 Honeywell
Interna-onal 
 





$
3,183,100
 AT&T
Inc 
 
 
 























2,776,875
 Electrical
Workers 
 
 













2,690,373
 Na-onal
Assoc
of
Realtors










2,685,054
 Na-onal
Beer
Wholesaler











2,556,500
 American
Assoc
for
Jus-ce










2,415,000
 American
Bakers
Assoc
















2,273,430
 Federal
Elec-on
CommiEee
 















































Dem








Rep





 Na-onal
Assn
of
Realtors



57%








43%
 Electrical
Workers
















98%










2%
 AT&T
Inc
































47%








52%
 Teamsters
Union


















97%










3%
 Amer.
Fed.
of
Teachers







99%










1%
 American
Bankers
Asso






58%








42%
 Race
for
the
office
of
President
 Democrats
 
$
1,079,200,000
 Republicans 
$


606,500,000
 4 10/19/10 Federal
Elec-on
CommiEee
 Race
for
the
office
of
President
 Democrats
 
$
1,079,200,000
 Republican 
$


606,500,000
 
 AdWeek
 •  Poli-cal
Spending
in
Adver-sing
 –  $1.7
billion
in
2004
 –  $2.5
billion
in
2008
 •  $1.2
billion
for
president


($
1.7
total
raised)
 Obama 
 
$

747,600,000
 South
Carolina
 Presiden-al
Elec-on





Amount
Raised
 1.  Democrats
 
$4,579,953
 2.  Republicans
 
$4,092,477
 •  a
nonpar-san,
nonprofit,
"consumer
advocate"
for
voters
 that
aims
to
reduce
the
level
of
decep-on
and
confusion
 in
U.S.
poli-cs
 •  a
project
of
the
Annenberg
Public
Policy
Center
of
the
 University
of
Pennsylvania.

 •  Brooks
Jackson
is
a
journalist
who
covered
Washington
 and
na-onal
poli-cs
for
34
years,
repor-ng
in
turn
for
 The
Associated
Press,
the
Wall
Street
Journal
and
CNN

 Federal
Communica-ons
Commission
 •  Federal
Communica-ons
Act
 •  (US
Code:
Title
47,
Sec.
315.
‐
Candidates
for
public
office)
 •  
 (a)
.
.
.
If
any
licensee
shall
permit
any
person
who
is
a
legally
 qualified
candidate
for
any
public
office
to
use
a
broadcas;ng
sta;on,
 he
shall
afford
equal
opportuni-es
to
all
other
such
candidates
for
that
 office
in
the
use
of
such
broadcas-ng
sta-on:
Provided,
That
such
 licensee
shall
have
no
power
of
censorship
over
the
material
 broadcast
under
the
provisions
of
this
sec;on.
 
We
are
a
nonpar-san,
nonprofit,
"consumer
advocate"
 for
voters
that
aims
to
reduce
the
level
of
decep;on
and
 confusion
in
U.S.
poli;cs.
We
monitor
the
factual
 accuracy
of
what
is
said
by
major
U.S.
poli-cal
players
in
 the
form
of
TV
ads,
debates,
speeches,
interviews,
and
 news
releases.
Our
goal
is
to
apply
the
best
prac;ces
of
 both
journalism
and
scholarship,
and
to
increase
public
 knowledge
and
understanding.
 5 10/19/10 Brooks
Jackson
‐
Director
 •  Here's
a
fact
that
may
surprise
you:
candidates
have
a
legal
right
to
lie
 to
voters
just
about
as
much
as
they
want.
 •  That
comes
as
a
shock
to
many
voters.
Aaer
all,
consumers
have
been
 protected
for
decades
from
false
ads
for
commercial
products.
 Shouldn't
there
be
"truth‐in‐adver-sing"
laws
to
protect
voters
,
too?
 •  Turns
out,
that's
a
tougher
ques-on
than
you
might
imagine.
 •  For
one
thing,
the
First
Amendment

to
the
US
Cons-tu-on
says
 "Congress
shall
make
no
law
.
.
.
abridging
the
freedom
of
speech,"
and
 that
applies
to
candidates
for
office
especially.
And
secondly,
in
the
few
 states
that
have
tried
laws
against
false
poli;cal
ads,
they
haven't
 been
very
effec;ve.
 Brooks
Jackson
‐
Director
 •  But
there's
no
such
truth‐in‐adver-sing
law
governing
federal
 candidates.
They
can
legally
lie
about
almost
anything
they
want.
In
 fact,
the
Federal
Communica-ons
Act
even
requires
broadcasters
 who
run
candidate
ads
to
show
them
uncensored,
even
if
the
 broadcasters
believe
their
content
to
be
offensive
or
false.
 •  All
this
should
tell
voters
that
‐‐
legally
‐‐
it's
preDy
much
up
to
them
 to
sort
out
who's
lying
and
who's
not
in
a
poli-cal
campaign.
Nobody
 said
Democracy
was
supposed
to
be
easy.
 The
President
 Reagan’s
Seven
Communica-on
Principles
 1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  Plan
ahead
 Stay
on
the
offensive
 Control
the
flow
of
informa-on
 Limit
reporter’s
access
to
the
president
 Talk
about
the
issues
you
want
to
talk
about
 Speak
in
one
voice
 Repeat
the
same
message
many
-mes

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 •  Weekly
Radio
Address
 •  White
House.
Gov
 •  Media
Ac-vi-es/Communica-ons
 Mini‐Case


FEMA
 •  Federal
Emergency
Management
Associa-on
 •  Fake
New
Conference
 –  Employees
as
reporters
 –  15
minutes
no-ce
 –  FEMA
provided
the
media
feed
 6 ...
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This note was uploaded on 06/13/2011 for the course JOUR 328 taught by Professor Klipstine during the Fall '10 term at South Carolina.

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