Chapter 8 Post

Chapter 8 Post - Research

 Chapter
8


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Unformatted text preview: Research

 Chapter
8
 The
Public
Rela3ons
Process
  Research
  Planning/Ac3on
  Communica3on
  Evalua3on
 Research
 
Research
is
the
systema3c
collec3on
and
 interpreta3on
of
informa3on
to
increase
 understanding
 Research
 
Research
is
the
controlled,
objec-ve,
and
 systema-c
gathering
of
informa3on
for
the
 purpose
of
describing
and
understanding
 Page
144
 Evalua3on
  Evalua3on
is
the
systema3c
assessment
of
a
 program
and
its
results
  Measurement
of
results
against
objec3ves
  Key
‐
accountability
 Research
–
Why
Do
We
Use?
 Research
conducted
to
do:
 1.  Describe
a
process
 2.  Explain
why
something
happened
 3.  Predict
what
will
probably
happen
 1 Research
–
Why
Do
We
Use?
 Research
conducted
to
do:
 1.  Describe
a
process
 2.  Explain
why
something
happened
 3.  Predict
what
will
probably
happen
 Research
Types


p.
146
 •  Applied

(Primary)
 – Strategic
–
develop
program
objec3ves
 – Evalua3ve
–
to
find
if
program
goals
were
 accomplished
 •  Theore3cal

(academic)
 – Conceptual
and
builds
theories
 •  Secondary
 – Developed
by
someone
else

  Basic
types
of
research
in
public
rela3ons
  Primary
(applied)
  Secondary
  Primary
(applied)

–
new
research
  Polls
  Surveys
  Interviews
  Focus
Groups
  Secondary
–
materials
generated
by
others
  Published
materials,
records
  Public
records
  Online
databases
  Journals,
newspapers
  Advantage
‐
inexpensive
 •  Surveys
–
to
examine
for
some
specific
 purpose;
inspect
or
consider
carefully;
review
 in
detail
 2 Survey
 Four
Elements
of
a
survey
 1.  Sample
   Representa3ve
of
the
total
public
used
 2.  Ques3onnaire
   The
survey
instrument
 3.  Interview
   Personal,
first
hand
feel
 4.  Analysis
of
results
 Survey
  Sample
–
segment
of
the
popula3on
  Nonprobability
sampling
  No
equal
chance
of
selec3on
  Nonscien3fic,
informal
  Probability
sampling
  Equal
chance
of
being
selected
  Scien3fic
   Analyze
the
findings,
valid
and
reliable
 Random
Sampling
  Simple
  All
members
an
equal
chance
  Systema3c
  Every
Nth
person
on
a
list
 Focus
Group:
A
Type
of
Survey
  Focus
Groups
  Informal
research
method
  Not
representa3ve
of
any
public
  Basically
inexpensive
  Stra3fied
  Survey
different
segments
of
the
popula3on
  Cluster
  Small
subsets,
geographic
regions
 Survey
‐
Web
Based
Research
 Focus
Group
  Approximately
8
–
12
people
  Moderator
skilled
in
interviewing

  Observe
the
session
  Discuss
opinions,
problems,
needs
  Limit
discussion
to
60
–
90
minutes
  In3macy
–
closer
together
  Precision
–
more
detailed
answers
  Timeliness
–
immediate
  Cost
–
reduced
costs
 3 Polls



p.
157
 •  “Popular
poli3cal
polls,
in
par3cular,
are
 fraught
with
problems.
They
cannot
predict
 outcomes
scien3fically.
Rather,
they
provide
a
 snapshot,
freezing
aitudes
at
a
certain
point
 in
3me.”
 Polls
  Use
of
sta3s3cs
  Facts
  Demographics
  Understanding
public
opinion
 Polls
and
Sta3s3cs
  Used
during
the
past
elec3on
  Polls
were
used
to
describe
and
predict
 everything!
 Communica3on
Audits
  The
evalua3on
of
the
en3re
communica3on
 ac3vity
of
an
organiza3on
 Evalua3on
  Accountability
–
taking
responsibility
for
 achieving
the
performance
promised.
  Analysis
of
all
communica3on
ac3vi3es
  Informal
interviews
with
management
and
 employees
  Informal
interviews
with
various
stakeholders;
 media,
community
leaders,
influen3al
persons
in
 the
industry
 4 Evalua3on
  Measurement
of
produc3on
  Measurement
of
message
exposure
  Measurement
of
audience
awareness
  Measurement
of
audience
aitudes
  Measurement
of
audience
ac3on
 Measurement
of
Message
Exposure
  Number
of
placements
and
where
  Hits
on
the
Internet
  Adver3sing
equivalency
  Requests
and
800
numbers
  Cost
per
person
  Audience
anendance
 Measurement
of
Audience
 Aitudes
 
Audience
aitudes
and
opinions
before,
 during
and
aoer
a
public
rela3ons
campaign
 
Baseline
study
–
shows
the
percentage
 differences
in
aitudes
as
a
result
of
the
 campaign
 Measurement
of
Produc3on
  How
much
material
produced?
  News
releases
  Feature
stories
  How
much
material
was
distributed?
  News
releases
to
how
many
news
sources
  Annual
report
numbers
 Measurement
of
Audience
Awareness
 Measure
whether
the
target
audience

  Received
the
message
  Paid
anen3on
to
the
message
  Understood
the
message
  Retained
the
message
in
any
shape
of
form
 Measurement
of
Audience
Ac3on
 Achieve
organiza3onal
objec3ves
  Anend
events
  Products
sold
  Funds
raised
  Legisla3on
passed
 5 ...
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