Chapter 2post - 9/6/10 Extra
Reading


Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 9/6/10 Extra
Reading
 The
History
and
Growth
of
Public
 Rela8ons
 Chapter
2
 “Mini‐Me”
History
 Public
Rela+ons
from
the
Dawn
of
Civiliza+on
 •  Posted
on
Blackboard
 •  Read
for
Exam
p.
1‐22
(not
Europe)
 •  Not
discussed
in
class
 Public
Rela8ons
Comes
of
Age
 Five
Major
Factors
in
the
Growth
of
PR
 1.  Growth
of
large
ins8tu8ons
 2.  Heightened
Public
Awareness
and
Media
 Sophis8ca8on
 3.  Societal
Change,
Conflict
and
Confronta8on
 4.  Growth
of
Global
Media,
Public
Opinion
and
 Capitalism
 5.  Dominance
of
the
Internet
 Heightened
Public
Awareness
and
 Media
Sophis8ca8on
 •  Cons8tu8on
and
the
Bill
of
Rights
 •  Progressive
Era
Reforms;
Women
right
to
vote;
Civil
 Rights;
Vietnam
War;
Cold
War
 •  Corporate
social
responsibility;
charity,
image,
 importance
of
the
stock
market
 •  Communica8ons
‐
Television,
cable,
the
Internet
,
 Public
segmenta8on
 •  Importance
of
Persuasion

 –  Need
for
communica8ons
in
emerging
democra8c
 socie8es
 Growth
of
Large
Ins8tu8ons
 •  •  •  •  •  •  The
Industrial
Revolu8on
 Concentra8on
of
wealth
 Increased
regula8on
–
growth
of
government
 Growth
of
labor
unions
 Need
for
beVer
communica8ons
 Economic
growth
following
WW
II
 Societal
Change,
Conflict,
and
Confronta8on
 •  1960’s
–
Vietnam
War
 •  Powerful
Interest
Groups
 –  Na8onal
Organiza8on
for
Women
 –  Minori8es‐
various
organiza8ons
 –  Environmental
groups

 •  Social
responsibility
 –  Government
programs
 •  Affirma8ve
ac8on
 •  Senior
ci8zen
programs
 1 9/6/10 Growth
of
Global
Media,
Public
 Opinion,
and
CAPITALISM
 •  Democracy
–
Berlin
Wall,
Nelson
Mandela,
 Afghanistan,
Taliban,
Iraq
 •  Global
communica8ons
 •  Public
opinion
–
research,
polls,
elec8ons
 Growth
of
the
Informa8on
Highway
 •  •  •  •  The
Internet
 Wireless
communica8on
 Cell
phones
 Social
Media
 •  An
es8mated
250
to
300
million
cell
phones
are
 being
used
in
the
U.S.

 •  The
average
American
cell
phone
user
owns
three
(3)
 or
more
expired
cell
phones.

 •  Over
70%
of
Americans
do
not
know
that
they
can
 recycle
their
old
cell
phone.

 •  In
a
recent
survey,
only
2.3%
of
Americans
recycled
 their
old
cell
phones
and
7%
threw
them
in
the
 garbage.

 Dominance
of
the
Internet
 •  •  •  •  •  Growth
on
on‐line
access
 Two‐way
communica8on
 A
new
genera8on
 E‐mail
 Social
Media
 Growth
of
the
Informa8on
Highway
 •  New
media,
new
op8ons,
new
choices
 •  Interac8ve
 •  U.S.
watch
sales,
which
have
been
on
the
 decline
since
2001,
fell
4.9
percent
in
2005
 and
17%
in
2008
 2 9/6/10 Cell
Phones
‐
E8queVe
 •  Never
take
a
personal
call
during
a
business
 mee8ng.
 •  Maintain
at
least
a
10
feet
free
zone
from
 anyone
while
talking
 •  Never
talk
in
elevators,
libraries,
museums,
 restaurants,
theaters,
enclosed
rooms
 •  Don’t
use
loud
and
annoying
ring
tones
 Cell
Phones
‐
E8queVe
 •  Never
have
any
emo8onal
conversa8ons
in
 public
 •  Never
mul8‐task
by
making
calls
while
 shopping,
banking,
wai8ng
in
line
or
 conduc8ng
personal
business
 Brief
History
of
PR
 •  •  • •  PhineasT.
Barnum
 Ivy
Lee
 Edward
Bernays
 Arthur
W.
Page
 Phineas
Taylor
Barnum
 •  “There’s
a
sucker
born
every
minute”
 Phineas
Taylor
Barnum
 •  Barnum and Bailey Circus - 1881 –  Circus sideshow –  Display of freaks •  •  •  •  •  Hucksterism – “Master Showman” “The public be fooled.” Publicity stunts – press agentry LIFE -100 Most Important People in 1800s Good PR – Bad PR ? Phineas
Taylor
Barnum
 •  Press
Agent
–
a
publicist
who
works
for
 recogni8on
of
an
organiza8on
or
individual
 •  “Every
crowd
has
a
sliver
lining”
 3 9/6/10 Pseudoevent
 The
planned
happening
that
occurs
 for
the
purpose
of
being
reported.
 Phineas
Taylor
Barnum
 •  “Prince of Humbugs” •  Four books –  –  –  –  –  Phineas
Taylor
Barnum
 •  1841 – Established Barum’s American Museum –  –  –  –  –  –  Cardiff Giant General Tom Thumb Fiji Mermaid Siamese twins Jenny Lind Started touring in 1850 •  1857 – P T Barnum’s Grand Traveling Museum, Menagerie, Caravan & Hippodrome “The Life of P.T. Barnum” “The Humbugs of the World” “Struggles and Triumphs” “The Art of Money-Getting” Series second only in sales to the “New Testament” Barnum’s
American
Museum

 •  •  •  •  •  1841
–
1865
in
New
York
City
 25
Cents
admission
–
various
aVrac8ons
 History,
memorabilia,
theater
 Burned
in
1865
 Turned
to
the
traveling
circus
 –  “The Greatest Show on Earth” The
Cardiff
Giant
 •  •  •  •  •  •  •  1869
‐
The
Greatest
Hoax
in
American
History
 10
foot
tall
petrified
man
 Made
by
George
Hull
–
prove
that
giants
once
lived
on
earth
 Carved
out
of
stone
–
then
buried
&
found!
 Charged
25
cents
then
50
cents
just
to
see
it
 Archaeological
scholars
pronounced
it
a
fake
 PT
Barnum
offered
$60,000
for
a
three
month
lease!
 –  They
said
NO!
 •  PT
Barnum
built
a
wax
model
–
said
it
was
the
real
giant!

 The
Cardiff
Giant
 PT
Barnum
–
his
was
real,
Hull’s
was
a
fake
 Lawsuit
 Hull
says
Barnum’s
giant
is
a
fake
 Judge
ruled
that
Barnum
could
not
be
sued
for
calling
a
fake
 giant
a
fake
 •  Where
are
they
now!
 •  •  •  •  –  Hull’s
–
Farmer’s
Museum
in
Coopertowns,
NY\
 –  Barnum’s
–
Marvin’s
Marvelous
Mechanical
Museum
in
 Farmington
Hills,
Mich.
 4 9/6/10 General
Tom
Thumb
 •  Charles
StraVon
–
2
feet
9
inches
 –  1838
‐
1883
 •  PT
Barnum
–
taught
him
to
sing
&
dance
 –  Toured
U.S.
and
Europe
 –  StraVon
became
very
wealthy
 Fiji
Mermaid
 •  •  •  •  Mummified
body
half
mammal
&
half
fish
 Common
exhibit
in
sideshows
1800s
 Barnum’s
lost
in
1865
fire
 Copied
many
8mes
since
 •  House
&
Yacht
 –  Married
in
1863
–
social
event
 –  StraVon
actually
helped
Barnum
finically
 Jenny
Lind
 •  •  •  •  •  “Swedish
Nigh8ngale”
 One
of
Europe’s
most
famous
singers
 Set
up
an
American
tour
 Full
houses
on
opening
night
 Donated
part
of
proceeds
to
local
charity
 Ivy
Lee
 •  •  •  •  •  Early
1900s
 “The
public
be
informed.”
–
philosophy
 Developed
pr
as
a
professional
discipline
 John
D.
Rockefeller,
Jr.
 “Poison
Ivy”
 –  S8ll
used
today
 Ivy
Lee
‐
PR
Firm
1910
 This
is
not
a
secret
press
bureau.
All
our
work
is

 done
in
the
open.
We
aim
to
supply
news….
Our

 maVer
is
accurate….
In
brief,
our
plan
is
frankly
and

 open,
on
behalf
of
business
concerns
and
public

 ins8tu8ons,
to
supply
the
press
and
public
of
the
 United
States
prompt
and
accurate
informa8on

 concerning
subjects
which
are
of
value
and
interest.
 Edward
Bernays
 •  •  •  •  •  •  1920s
–
1990s
 First
public
rela8ons
scholar
 Taught
the
first
public
rela8ons
course
 Wrote
three
major
books
on
public
rela8ons
 Own
pr
firm
in
1919
 Creel
CommiVee
member
WW
I
 5 9/6/10 Edward
Bernays
 1929
 •  Torches
of
Freedom
March
 •  Light’s
Golden
Jubilee
 Light’s
Golden
Jubilee
 •  Dearborn,
Michigan
 •  Tribute
to
Thomas
Edison
 •  Laboratory
to
Greenfield
Village
 –  Henry
Ford
 –  John
D.
Rockefeller
 –  J.P.
Morgan
 –  Marie
Curie
 –  Orville
Wright
 –  Will
Rogers
 –  President
Hoover
 Light’s
Golden
Jubilee
 
On
October
21,
1929,
Henry
Ford
hosted
an
elaborate
 celebra8on
in
Dearborn,
Michigan,
in
honor
of
his
friend
 Thomas
A.
Edison.
Known
as
Light’s
Golden
Jubilee,
the
date
 marked
the
50
th
anniversary
of
Edison’s
invenIon
of
the
 electric
light.
Ford
also
planned
his
event
as
a
dedica8on
of
 his
own
las8ng
tribute
to
Thomas
Edison
and
to
American
 innova8on,
the
Edison
Ins8tute
of
Technology
(later
renamed
 Henry
Ford
Museum)
and
Greenfield
Village.
Here,
Henry
Ford
 had
moved
the
Menlo
Park,
New
Jersey,
laboratory
where
the
 inventor
made
his
discovery
so
many
years
before.

 Arthur
W.
Page
 •  1927
–
first
vice
president
of
public
rela8ons
 for
American
Telephone
and
Telegraph
 •  Concept
that
public
rela8ons
should
have
an
 ac8ve
voice
in
management
 •  1983
–
Arthur
W.
Page
Society
formed
 Arthur
W.
Page
 Aurthur
W.
Page
Society
‐
Principles
 
Philosophy
–
“All
business
in
a
democra8c
 country
begins
with
public
permission
and
 exists
by
public
approval.
If
that
be
true,
it
 follows
that
business
should
be
cheerfully
 willing
to
tell
the
public
what
its
policies
are,
 what
it
is
doing,
and
what
it
hopes
to
do.
This
 seems
prac8cally
a
duty.”
 
Arthur
W.
Page
prac8ced
seven
principles
of
public
 rela8ons
management
as
a
means
of
implemen8ng
 his
philosophy.
 •  Tell
the
truth.
Let
the
public
know
what's
happening
 and
provide
an
accurate
picture
of
the
company's
 character,
ideals
and
prac8ces.
 6 9/6/10 •  Prove
it
with
ac+on.
Public
percep8on
of
an
 organiza8on
is
determined
90
percent
by
what
it
 does
and
10
percent
by
what
it
says.

 •  Listen
to
the
customer.
To
serve
the
company
well,
 understand
what
the
public
wants
and
needs.
Keep
 top
decision
makers
and
other
employees
informed
 about
public
reac8on
to
company
products,
policies
 and
prac8ces.
 •  Manage
for
tomorrow.
An8cipate
public
reac8on
and
 eliminate
prac8ces
that
create
difficul8es.
Generate
 goodwill.
 •  Realize
a
company's
true
character
is
expressed
by
its
 people.
The
strongest
opinions
‐‐
good
or
bad
‐‐
 about
a
company
are
shapedby
the
words
and
deeds
 of
its
employees.
As
a
result,
every
employee
‐‐
 ac8ve
or
re8red
‐‐
is
involved
with
public
rela8ons.
It
 is
the
responsibility
of
corporate
communica8ons
to
 support
each
employee's
capability
and
desire
to
be
 an
honest,
knowledgeable
ambassador
to
customers,
 friends,
shareowners
and
public
officials.
 •  Remain
calm,
pa+ent
and
good‐humored.
Lay
the
 groundwork
for
public
rela8ons
miracles
with
 consistent
and
reasoned
aVen8on
to
informa8on
 and
contacts.
This
may
be
difficult
with
today's
 conten8ous
24‐hour
news
cycles
and
endless
 number
of
watchdog
organiza8ons.
But
when
a
crisis
 arises,
remember,
cool
heads
communicate
best.

 •  Conduct
public
rela+ons
as
if
the
whole
company
 depends
on
it.
Corporate
rela8ons
is
a
management
 func8on.
No
corporate
strategy
should
be
 implemented
without
considering
its
impact
on
the
 public.
The
public
rela8ons
professional
is
a
 policymaker
capable
of
handling
a
wide
range
of
 corporate
communica8ons
ac8vit
 So
Why
These
Four:
 •  P
T
Barnum
 –  Press
Agent,
publicity
 •  Ivy
Lee
 –  Developed
PR
as
a
profession

 •  Edward
Bernays
 –  PR
scholar,
counsel,
persuasion
 •  Arthur
Paige
 –  Established
corporate
public
rela8ons
 7 ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 06/13/2011 for the course JOUR 328 taught by Professor Klipstine during the Fall '10 term at South Carolina.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online