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LectureCH06 - 6 Newspapers Reflectionofa DemocraticSociety...

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6 Newspapers Reflection of a  Democratic Society
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Inventing the Modern Press Martin Luther and John Calvin: published newspaper-like broadsheets in the 1500s Newspapers first appeared in England in the 1620s. Publick Occurrence: first newspaper in the American colonies (1690) Boston News Letter : first to publish multiple issues (1704)
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Benjamin and James Franklin James started the New England Courant in 1721: first newspaper published without approval of the British government 16-year-old Benjamin takes over after James is jailed. Benjamin Franklin purchased the Pennsylvania Gazette in 1729: featured first political cartoon introduced the weather report as a regular feature
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The Penny Press: Newspapers for the People Before 1830s, papers contained shipping news and political essays. designed primarily for the wealthy elite underwritten by political parties expensive, as much as 6 cents a day Average worker might make 85 cents a day available only by annual subscription, paid in advance
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Penny Press (cont.) September 3, 1833—Benjamin Day begins publishing the New York Sun: paper’s motto was “It shines for all” inexpensive, sold for a penny or two on the street derived the name penny press profits came primarily from advertising revenue invented the concept of “news”
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A Modern Democratic Society Increase in number of papers in just a decade: In 1830—650 weeklies and 65 dailies in the United States In 1840—1,241 weeklies and 138 dailies Changes wrought by industrial revolution: Shift from rural to urban, agricultural to industrial society People working for wages, purchasing consumer goods Penny press—provided means for advertising these goods
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Pulitzer, Hearst, and the Battle for New York City Joseph Pulitzer came to the United States from Austria in 1864 to fight in U.S. Civil War in 1878, bought the St. Louis Post and Dispatch in 1883, bought the failing New York World boosted circulation from 15,000 to more than 250,000 in 3 years
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