LectureCH07 - 7 Sound Music and Talk Across Media The...

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Unformatted text preview: 7 Sound Music and Talk Across Media The Development of the Recording Industry • Thomas Edison: invented the phonograph in 1877 first recording, “Mary Had a Little Lamb”, lasted 10 seconds • Emile Berliner: invented the gramophone by 1888 utilized flat disks, provided more lifelike recordings first to envision idea of royalties Development of the Recording Industry (cont.) • high fidelity —refers to a combination of technologies that allowed recordings to: reproduced music more accurately have higher high notes and deeper bass • magnetic tape industry standard by 1949 • recording allowed for preservation: non-notated music —music that does not exist in written form Transmitting Music and Talk: The Birth of Radio • Samuel Morse: invented the telegraph in 1844 • Heinrich Hertz: experimented with radio waves in 1888 created a simple transmitter and receiver • Guglielmo Marconi: developed the wireless telegraph Transmitting Music and Talk (cont.) • Reginald Fessenden: started sending voice signals over a radio in 1901 broadcasted Christmas carols and poetry in 1905 • David Sarnoff: American Marconi employee in 1915, wrote the Radio Music Box memo • radio as a popular mass medium • essentially ignored • focus was on support of United States in World War I Transmitting Music and Talk (cont.) • Frank Conrad (Westinghouse): began broadcasting music on Sunday afternoons Westinghouse built a more powerful transmitter released a broadcast schedule goal was to get people to buy radios KDKA was licensed on October 27, 1920 Radio Advertising • WEAF in New York City: first to sell air time to advertisers • Secretary of Commerce Herbert Hoover: believed ads would destroy credibility of radio news • Sales of radios thought to be main revenue source • Early executives realized advertising revenue necessary Radio Networks • In 1923 more than 600 radio broadcast stations in the United States: provided limited programming in a localized area • Sarnoff’s idea of a network: could provide more programming to a wider group of stations • RCA established NBC on July 22, 1926: actually two networks, Red and Blue Radio Networks (cont.) • William Paley...
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This note was uploaded on 06/13/2011 for the course JOUR 201 taught by Professor Roberts during the Fall '08 term at South Carolina.

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LectureCH07 - 7 Sound Music and Talk Across Media The...

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