LectureCH12 - 12 Public Relations Manufacturingthe News...

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12 Public Relations Manufacturing the  News 
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From Press Agentry to Professionalism The origins of public relations: pamphlets like Thomas Paine’s Common Sense outgrowth of the industrial revolution companies looking to change their image press agentry —a one-way form of public relations that involved sending material from the press agent to the media
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One-way communication early press agents: focused on building publicity for their clients no management of a specific image The beginnings of image management railroad and utilities used to press to shine positive light on the industries covered up monopolies
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Ivy Lee: key founder of modern public relations built campaigns around symbolism strived to put a human face on corporations first to deal with crisis management recognized the importance of telling the truth issued a Declaration of Principles: Openly and honestly supply accurate and timely news to the press.
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Edward L. Bernays: first to apply social-scientific research techniques engineering consent —use of psychology to manipulate public opinion having messages delivered by credible sources best way to reach the public understood importance of two-way interaction
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World War I: The federal government starts using public relations: Federal government used public relations extensively during World War I. President Wilson established Committee on Public Information (CPI) under George Creel: CPI used advertising, billboards, posters, and pamphlets. CPI enlisted 75,000 “Four-Minute Men” to give speeches
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LectureCH12 - 12 Public Relations Manufacturingthe News...

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