LectureCH14 - 14 Media Ethics Truthfulness,Fairness,...

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14 Media Ethics Truthfulness, Fairness,  and Standards of  Decency
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Ethical Principles and Decision Making morals —a religious or philosophical code of behavior that may or may not be rational ethics —come from the ancient Greek study of the rational way of deciding what is good for individuals Ethics consist of the ways in which we make choices between competing moral principles.
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Aristotle (350 B.C): golden mean —striking a balance between excess and defect example: courage To behave ethically, according to Aristotle, individuals must: know what they are doing. select their action with a moral reason. act out of good character.
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Immanuel Kant (late eighteenth century): categorical imperative —asks people to consider what would be the result of everyone acting the same way they themselves wish to act John Stuart Mills: principle of utility —the greatest good for the greatest number John Rawls: veil of ignorance —justice emerges when we make decisions without considering the status of the people involved and without considering where we personally fall in the social system
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Hutchins Commission (1947): founded by Henry Luce report reached two major conclusions: The press has a responsibility to give voice to the public and to society. The free press was not living up to that responsibility to the public because of its need to serve its commercial masters.
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The Hutchins Commission listed five requirements for a responsible press: 1. The media should provide a truthful, comprehensive, and intelligent account of the day’s events in a context that gives them meaning. 2. The media should serve as a forum for the exchange of comment and criticism (i.e., the press should present the full range of thought and criticism). 3. The media should project a representative picture of the constituent groups within the society. 4. The media should present and clarify the goals and
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This note was uploaded on 06/13/2011 for the course JOUR 201 taught by Professor Roberts during the Fall '08 term at South Carolina.

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LectureCH14 - 14 Media Ethics Truthfulness,Fairness,...

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