Hanson Chapter 4 Notes (1)

Hanson Chapter 4 Notes (1) - 4 Books TheBirthofthe...

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4 Books The Birth of the  Mass Media
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The Development of the Book and Mass Communication Books allowed: the spread of ideas the standardization of language and spelling the creation of mass culture Also helped bring about major social changes.
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Early Books and Writing: Writing is thought to have originated around 3500 B.C. in the Middle East, in either Egypt or Mesopotamia. Reading and writing allowed information to be stored and preserved. Reading and writing were elite skills held by people called scribes.
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Pictograph —earliest form of writing was the which consisted of pictures of objects painted on rock walls. Ideograph —an abstract symbol that stands for an object or an idea: Are more formalized than a pictograph. One symbol stands for each object or idea. Languages such as Chinese, Korean, and Japanese still make use of ideographs. Street signs still make use of.
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Phonography —a system of writing in which symbols stand for spoken sounds rather than for objects or ideas; developed around 2000 B.C. Alphabets— letters representing individual sounds; were developed between 1700 B.C. and 1500 B.C.
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The Development of Paper o Papyrus —a primitive form of paper made from the papyrus reed: developed by the Egyptians around 3100 tended to crumble or be eaten by bugs o Parchment —made from the skin of goats or sheep: replaced papyrus because it was more durable o Paper— made from cotton rags or wood: invented by the Chinese sometime between 240 and 105 B.C. spread throughout Europe during the 1300s, replaced parchment in the 1500s.
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Books before the Era of Printing: Most books in Europe were religious texts hand- copied by monks, produced in the scriptoria , or copying rooms of monasteries. Rise of literacy in the thirteenth century increased demand for books. Demand for books greatly exceeded production.
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Books before the Era of Printing (cont.): Books were still hand-copied one at a time: Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales By the fourteenth century books were becoming relatively common. Illuminated manuscripts—
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Hanson Chapter 4 Notes (1) - 4 Books TheBirthofthe...

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