17 - The Coriolis Effect and Wind Surface Wind Pressure...

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The Coriolis Effect and Wind Coriolis Effect Apparent deflection of the wind N. hem: wind is deflected to the right S. hem: wind is deflected to the left. Coriolis Effect Winds in the Northern Hemisphere moving across a gradient from high to low pressure are apparently deflected to the right of their expected path (and to the left in the Southern Hemisphere). At the surface: When considering winds at the Earth’s surface We must take into account another force, friction . Above the Earth’s surface, frictional drag is of little consequence to wind development. Frictional drag reduces wind speed which in turn, reduces the Coriolis Effect. A surface wind flows obliquely across isobars toward low pressure area.
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Unformatted text preview: The Coriolis Effect and Wind Surface Wind Pressure Gradient Force (PGF) Friction force Coriolis effect Wind crosses isobars Upper atmosphere: The Coriolis Effect and Wind At altitudes 1000 meters or more, frictional drag is of little consequence to the wind. No frictional drag. Geostrophic Wind upper level winds in which the Coriolis effect and pressure gradient are balanced, resulting in a wind flowing parallel to isobars. PGF Coriolis force Wind parallel to isobars The Coriolis Effect and Wind Surface Wind Pressure Gradient Force (PGF) Friction force Coriolis effect Wind crosses isobars...
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