Positional number systems

Positional number systems - CGS 3269 Computer Architecture...

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CGS 3269 Computer Architecture Concepts Positional number systems 1.- Decimal number system 2.- Binary number system 3.- Hexadecimal number system 4.- Base conversions
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CGS 3269 Computer Architecture Concepts Positional number systems When we need to write the number three hundred and twenty five using decimal digits we use the following sequence of digits: 325 What do we know about this number? It is written using decimal digits (a digit from 0 to 9 in decimal notation), which means that the base of the decimal number system is 10 ( the decimal system has ten symbols or digits ). Formally we can write 325 as: 3 x 10 2 + 2 x 10 1 + 5 x 10 0 = (3 x 100) + (2 x 10) + (5 x 1) = 300 + 20 + 5 = 325 Note that 10 0 = 1
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CGS 3269 Computer Architecture Concepts Positional number systems Formally we can write 325 as: 3 x 10 2 + 2 x 10 1 + 5 x 10 0 = (3 x 100) + (2 x 10) + (5 x 1) = 300 + 20 + 5 = 325 Note that 10 0 = 1 By denoting the base of the system as b = 10, we can rewrite 325 as: 325 = 3 x b 2 + 2 x b
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This note was uploaded on 06/13/2011 for the course CGS 3269 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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Positional number systems - CGS 3269 Computer Architecture...

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