Sepulchre of Songs study guide

Sepulchre of Songs study guide - A Sepulchre of Songs Here...

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“A Sepulchre of Songs” Here is Orson Scott Card on how the plot and symbolism of this story gradually changed: I remember reading a spate of stories about human beings who had been cyborgized— their brains put into machinery so that moving an arm actually moved a cargo bay door and walking actually fired up a rocket engine, that sort of thing. It seemed that almost all of these stories—and a lot of robot and android stories as well—ended up being rewrites of “Pinocchio.” They always wish they could be a real boy. In years since then, the fashion has changed and more sf writers celebrate rather than regret the body mechanical. Still, at the time, the issue interested me. Couldn’t there be someone for whom a mechanical body would be liberating? So I wrote a story that juxtaposed two characters, one a pinocchio of a spaceship, a cyborg that wished for the sensation of real life; the other, a hopelessly crippled human being, trapped in a body that can never act , longing for the power that would come from a mechanical replacement. They trade places, and both are happy. A simple enough tale, but I couldn’t tell it quite that way. Perhaps because I wanted it to be truer than a fantasy, I told the story from the perspective of a human observer
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Sepulchre of Songs study guide - A Sepulchre of Songs Here...

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