syllabus_ENV2073_2010 - SYLLABUS ENV 2073 Global Warming:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
p 1/12 SYLLABUS ENV 2073 Global Warming: Science and Politics of a Contemporary Issue University of South Florida Fall 2010 Prof J.A. Cunningham Course Description Non-technical introduction to the greenhouse effect and how human activities purportedly affect the global climate. Investigation of the relationship between science and the political process. Proposed policies to address global warming. More About This Course This course is strongly inter-disciplinary, focusing not just on the science of global climate change, but equally on the policy and politics of global climate change. The first half of the course covers the science of global climate change in a non-technical manner that is easy for students to understand. The second half covers proposed solutions to the issue of global warming, both technical and political, and considers the advantages and disadvantages of these proposed solutions. Over the semester, students will formulate their own recommendations for a national policy regarding climate change. Foundations of Knowledge and Learning Core Curriculum This course is part of the University of South Florida’s Foundations of Knowledge and Learning Core Curriculum (also known as the General Education or Gen Ed program). This course is certified for the Physical Sciences core area, and for the following dimensions: Critical Thinking, Inquiry- based Learning, Environmental Perspectives, and Written Language. In addition, this course will emphasize many elements from the Scientific Processes dimension, although the course is not certified for that dimension. Course Topics: (1) Introduction to the earth's climate; (2) Science of the “greenhouse effect”; (3) Hypotheses of how human activities affect the global climate; (4) Possible future effects of global climate change; (5) The nature of uncertainty in scientific predictions; (6) Relationships between the scientific process and the political process; (7) Proposed strategies (technical and political) to address global climate change; (8) Status of climate-change bills introduced in the U.S. Congress; (9) Status of international agreements for dealing with climate change.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
p 2/12 SYLLABUS ENV 2073 Global Warming: Science and Politics of a Contemporary Issue University of South Florida Fall 2010 Prof J.A. Cunningham Course Objectives During this semester, students will: 1. demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate theories on how human activities may impact the global climate; 2. demonstrate knowledge of predicted future effects of global climate change and the uncertainty associated with those predictions; 3. investigate the relationship between the scientific process and the political process; and 4. formulate a recommended national policy to address global climate change, and will argue persuasively for their recommendation. Student Outcomes
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 12

syllabus_ENV2073_2010 - SYLLABUS ENV 2073 Global Warming:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online