P14_S&C_Thucydides

P14_S&C_Thucydides - Thucydides Click to edit...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 6/14/11 Thucydides
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6/14/11 Naval Warfare I would like to discuss for a moment the triremes used in most of the naval engagements depicted by Thucydides during the Peloponnesian war (This discussion is based on the article by Dr. Nicolle Hirschfeld, “Trireme Warfare in Thucydides” that comprises appendix G of R. B. Strassler (ed.), The Landmark Thucydides: A Comprehensive Guide to the
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6/14/11 The Triremes The triremes in general were fast, maneuverable ships with offensive capabilities varying directly in proportion to the training and experience of the crews manning them. The main offensive weapon was a bronze encased ram mounted on the prow. They were long and sleek ships, having a length to beam ratio of 9:1. Their great speed was generated in
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6/14/11 Bronze Ram
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6/14/11
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6/14/11 The Crew The hull itself enclosed two levels of rowers: the thalamites in the depths of the hold, and the zygites were seated on the hull’s crossbeams (thwarts). The third row of oarsmen, the thranites , were seated in outriggers mounted along the top sides of the hull. Since speed was of primary importance, the rest of the crew was reduced to a bare minimum. The standard complement consisted of four
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6/14/11 Battle Formations The presence of the ram on the prow, combined with the added support work of timbers rendered this area the most well protected of the ship. The stern and sides of the ship were vulnerable to attack. The captain attempted to keep the prow directed toward the enemy with the trireme thus poised for an offensive or defensive action. Along the coastline the advantageous position for battle was a battle line
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6/14/11 Periplous If two lines of triremes engaged one another, there were several maneuvers that could be used for attacking the enemy. One was called the periplous , which means literally, “sailing around”. In this maneuver, principally employed by the better trained Athenians, the ships outflanked the enemy, and then turning quickly, they struck them from behind.
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6/14/11
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6/14/11 Diekplous A second maneuver termed diekplous , which means, “sailing through”, was performed when the Athenian ships penetrated through the gaps formed between the enemy ships and then sought to turn quickly and ram the enemy ships generally in the stern area.
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6/14/11
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6/14/11
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6/14/11 Ancient Diplomacy The Corcyreans, as we saw, were successful in their efforts to persuade the Athenians to help them in their difficulties with Corinth, principally because they were able to offer the Athenians the advantages of a large, well equipped navy. The Corinthians now feel compelled to bring the Athenian involvement to the attention of the Spartans (Lacedaemonians). We resume the story just as the
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6/14/11 Assessing the Speeches Athenian envoys are present in Sparta at that time on other business and after hearing the speeches they felt compelled to speak to the Spartans on behalf of their own city. In this type of
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This note was uploaded on 06/14/2011 for the course CLAS 240 taught by Professor Beck during the Spring '11 term at South Carolina.

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P14_S&C_Thucydides - Thucydides Click to edit...

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