P13_S&C_Thucydides

P13_S&C_Thucydides - Thucydides Click to edit...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 6/14/11 Thucydides
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6/14/11 Thucydides Connor, p. 12: “We can infer that the text was written by a complex and intense individual, but one who tells us very little about himself.” W. R. Connor, Thucydides , Princeton: Princeton University Press (1984).
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6/14/11
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6/14/11 Herodotus and Thucydides Herodotus, while he was presenting his great historical work in Athens, noticed a boy weeping in the audience, emotionally caught up in the events being depicted. When he had finished his presentation, Herodotus sought out the boy’s father and said to him: “Olorus, your boy’s nature strongly inclines him towards the avid pursuit of knowledge” (Marcellinus, Life 54). The boy, as the biographer Marcellinus tells us, was Thucydides. With the passing
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6/14/11 His debt would remain perceptible in many areas, in others the critical analytical cast of Thucydides’ mind would cause him to develop a variety of historical writing that many modern historians to this very day consider exemplary. Like Herodotus, he focuses on a military conflict. Unlike Herodotus, however, he does not deviate from his main purpose through the presentation of charming stories or
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6/14/11 Liberty and Power Raaflaub, p. 184: “Herodotus no less than Thucydides sees history as dominated by the two antithetical desires for liberty and power. The nomos of the Persian kings, always to expand and to leave nothing untried, clashes with the nomos of the Spartans, never to submit. These desires determine the historic conflict between Persia and the Greeks. They are complimented by a third and equally potent force driving people’s
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6/14/11 Influences: 1) Sophistic Movement: rethinking and re-evaluating tradition. Nomos (arbitrariness of conventional restraints on behavior) vs. physis (drives and demands of human nature => natural right of stronger to dominate weaker). Connor (1984) 14.
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6/14/11 Influences: 2) Hippocratic Medicine: cause and effect, diagnosis and prognosis, observable patterns of behavior of illnesses leading to prognosis and perhaps intervention by physician and prevention of death.
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6/14/11 Techniques: Juxtaposition; prefiguration and repetition; contrast and reversal; and the integration of speech and narrative. John Marincola, Greek Historians , Oxford; Oxford University Press (2001).
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6/14/11 Juxtapostion: Funeral oration (idealistic portrait; 2. 35-46), description of plague (harrowing portrait of human suffering; central element of triptych; 2. 47-54), second speech of Pericles (grim reality of the chance and suffering of war; 2. 60-64). Melian Dialogue (end of bk. 5) before Sicilian Expedition (bks. 6-7).
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6/14/11 Erechtheion
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Logos and Ergon The discrepancy between logos and ergon is brought out in these juxtapositions very often. Logos= speech(es), rational
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This note was uploaded on 06/14/2011 for the course CLAS 240 taught by Professor Beck during the Spring '11 term at South Carolina.

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P13_S&C_Thucydides - Thucydides Click to edit...

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