P12_S&C_Herodotus_Histories_3_6_7_ 8

P12_S&C_Herodotus_Histories_3_6_7_ 8 - Herodotus...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–23. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Click to edit Master subtitle style 6/14/11 Herodotus Histories books 3, 7, 8
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6/14/11 Woman as cause of war 3. 1, p. 170: The pretext for Cambyses involvement with Egypt: a woman again (Amasis does not send own daughter but sends Nitetis, daughter of previous king of Egypt Apries, instead)! 3.4, p. 171f. Other cause (?): Hallicarnassian mercenary in Amasis’ army named Phanes.
Background image of page 2
6/14/11 Herodotus’ historical method But the Egyptians, who say that Cambyses was the son of this daughter of Apries, claim him as one of theirs; they say that it was Cyrus who asked Amasis for his daughter, and not Cambyses.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6/14/11 [2] But what they say is false. They are certainly not unaware (for if any understand the customs of the Persians the Egyptians do) firstly, that it is not their custom for illegitimate offspring to rule when there are legitimate offspring; and secondly, that Cambyses was the son of Cassandane, the daughter of Pharnaspes, who was an Achaemenid, and not of the
Background image of page 4
6/14/11 The following story, incredible to me, is also told: that one of the Persian women who came to visit Cyrus' wives, and saw the tall and attractive children who stood by Cassandane, expressed her admiration in extravagant terms. Then Cassandane, Cyrus' wife, said, “Although I am the mother of such children, Cyrus dishonors me and honors his new woman from Egypt.” So she spoke in her bitterness against
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6/14/11 “Then, mother, when I am grown up, I will turn all Egypt upside down.” When he said this, he was about ten years old, and the women were amazed; but he kept it in mind, and it was thus that when he grew up and became king, he made the campaign against Egypt.
Background image of page 6
6/14/11
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6/14/11
Background image of page 8
6/14/11
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6/14/11 3. 12, p. 174: Another wonder: Skull thickness of Persians and Egyptians and the causes of this. H. shows great interest in medicine.
Background image of page 10
6/14/11 Hippocrates of Chios ca. 450 BCE
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6/14/11
Background image of page 12
6/14/11
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6/14/11 Diagnostic method in ancient Greek medicine The word " diagnosis " comes from the Greek, and literally means, "knowing through". Diagnosis is the ability to see through the often bewildering array of manifest symptoms to arrive at an empirically based conclusion as to their cause , or what is really going on. This requires the physician to be something like a detective, sifting
Background image of page 14
6/14/11 Religious Sacrilege 1 3. 16, p. 177: Cambyses commits religious sacrilege by burning mummy of Amasis (first supreme act of hybris).
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6/14/11
Background image of page 16
6/14/11
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6/14/11
Background image of page 18
6/14/11 Ate 3. 25, pp. 180f.: Cambyses takes leave of his senses and mounts an expedition against Ethiopia without sufficient planning and provisions.
Background image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6/14/11 Religious Sacrilege 2 3. 27-29, pp. 182f.: Cambyses, paranoid, puts end to religious celebration and kills the sacred bull Apis of the Egyptians for his second great religious sacrilege.
Background image of page 20
6/14/11 Cambyses’ Crimes 3. 30-32, pp. 183f.: The madness and crimes of Cambyses: 1) Murder of his brother, Smerdis. 2) Murder (in anger) of his sister (and wife!).
Background image of page 21

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6/14/11 Madness ( ate ) 3. 33, pp. 184f.: The cause of his madness: 1) Treatment of Apis (i.e., madness of divine origin sent as punishment by god.), 2) One of the
Background image of page 22
Image of page 23
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 104

P12_S&C_Herodotus_Histories_3_6_7_ 8 - Herodotus...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 23. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online