P7_S&C_Homer

P7_S&C_Homer - Homer The Historicity of the Trojan...

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6/14/11 Homer
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6/14/11 The Historicity of the Trojan War When Alexander, on his way to do battle with the forces of the Persian king Darius III, went to the city of Troy he performed the following significant acts: 1) He exchanged some of his armor with some weapons which were preserved from the Trojan War and hung for display
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6/14/11 Alexander honors Achilles 2)He offered sacrifice to Priam to avert his anger against the family of Neoptolemus, the son of Achilles, whose blood still ran in his own veins. 3)While his friend, Hephaestion, laid a wreath on the tomb of Patroclus, Alexander laid a wreath on the tomb of Achilles and called him a lucky man, in that he had Homer to proclaim his deeds and preserve his memory .
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6/14/11 Not this Homer!
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6/14/11 The Greek Conception of the Trojan War The symbolism inherent in these acts reflects clearly the dominant conception the ancient Greeks had of Homer and the characters in the Iliad: they were real historical individuals who lived and died on this earth, who enjoyed a semi-divine status and were worshipped as heroes. Their descendants walked
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6/14/11 East vs. West Implicit in Alexander’s actions is the conceptualization of the war he is about to undertake as a continuation of the conflict between the Greeks of the West and the aggressors of the East, this time the Persians. For Alexander the Trojan War was a reality, an event that really happened, and he was the modern successor to Achilles about to deal out death on an even greater
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6/14/11 Heinrich Schliemann and the discovery of Troy This image of the Trojan War as an historical event and not just a story of the mythic past was lost for centuries until 1870 when it was resurrected by Heinrich Schliemann. Schliemann, a German born merchant turned American citizen, believed in the Troy saga, assumed that the myths indicate historical
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6/14/11 Hissarlik in Turkey=Troy Today the site, Hissarlik, in Turkey is universally acknowledged to be the actual physical location correlating with Homer’s description in the Iliad . The significant result of Schliemann’s inspired quest is that spawned intensive investigation of other sites mentioned by Homer in the Iliad . Schliemann excavated
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6/14/11
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6/14/11
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6/14/11
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6/14/11 Sophia Schliemann
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6/14/11 Troy and History Shaft graves (“ face of Agamemnon” ) Tholos tombs (“ Atreus” “ Clytemnestra” ) Cyclopean walls Many palace centers: Tiryns, Pylos (Nestor), Thebes (Oedipus) Conclusion: Trojan war a real, i. e., historical event. Bronze age palace culture lasting from
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The Catastrophe Linear B clay tablets (which survived because they were accidentally baked in the fires that destroyed the palaces) were unearthed at Knossos (from 1450 B.C.E. the Mycenaeans seized control of Knossos) and Pylos. 1952 Michael Ventris deciphers Linear
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P7_S&C_Homer - Homer The Historicity of the Trojan...

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