P10_S&C_Homer_Olympics

P10_S&C_Homer_Olympics - Homers Iliad and the...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 6/14/11 Homer’s Iliad and the Olympics
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6/14/11 Diomedes meets Lycian guest-friend Glaucus on Glaucus son of Hippolochus and Tydeus' son Diomedes met in the no man's land between both armies: burning for battle, closing, squaring off and the lord of the war cry Diomedes opened up, "Who are you, my fine friend?-another born to die?
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6/14/11 I have no desire to fight the blithe immortals. But if you're a man who eats the crops of the earth, a mortal born for death-here, come closer, the sooner you will meet your day to die!"
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6/14/11 Glaucus answers: The noble son of Hippolochus answered staunchly, "High-hearted son of Tydeus, why ask about my birth? Like the generations of leaves, the lives of mortal men. Now the wind scatters the old leaves across the earth, now the living timber bursts with the new buds and spring comes round again. And so with men: as one generation comes to life, another dies away.
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6/14/11 There you have my lineage. That is the blood I claim, my royal birth.” When he heard that, Diornedes' spirits lifted. Raising his spear, the lord of the war cry drove it home, planting it deep down in the earth that feeds us all and with winning words he called out to Glaucus,
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6/14/11 my guest from the days of our grandfathers long ago! Noble Oeneus hosted your brave Bellerophon once, he held him there in his halls, twenty whole days, and they gave each other handsome gifts of friendship.
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6/14/11 They exchange armor, a demonstration of xenia . But let's trade armor. The men must know our claim: we are sworn friends from our fathers' days till now!" Both agreed. Both fighters sprang from their chariots, clasped each other's hands and traded pacts of friendship. But the son of Cronus, Zeus, stole Glaucus' wits away. He traded his gold armor for bronze
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6/14/11 The exchange between Glaucus and Diomedes
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6/14/11 Hector finds Andromache At that, Hector spun and rushed from his house, back by the same way down the wide, well-paved streets throughout the city until he reached the Scaean Gates, the last point he would pass to gain the field of battle. There his warm, generous wife came running up to meet him, Andromache the daughter of gallant-
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6/14/11 Hector
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6/14/11
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6/14/11 Hector and Andromache
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6/14/11
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6/14/11 Astyanax His daughter had married Hector helmed in bronze. She joined him now, and following in her steps a servant holding the boy against her breast, in the first flush of life, only a baby, Hector's son, the darling of his eyes and radiant as a star ... Hector would always call the boy Scamandrius, townsmen called him Astyanax. Lord of the City,
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6/14/11 Anromache’s fear : The great man of war breaking into a broad smile, his gaze fixed on his son, in silence.
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