P8_S&C_Homer_Iliad

P8_S&C_Homer_Iliad - Homer The Iliad Click to edit...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 6/14/11 Homer The Iliad
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6/14/11 The Subject of the Poem Rage-Goddess, sing the rage of Peleus' son Achilles, Murderous, doomed, that cost the Achaeans countless losses, hurling down to the House of Death so many sturdy souls, great fighters' souls, but made their bodies carrion. feasts for the dogs and birds,
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6/14/11 Pope’s version ACHILLES' wrath, to Greece the direful spring Of woes unnumber'd, heavenly Goddess, sing! That wrath which hurl'd to Pluto's gloomy reign The souls of mighty Chiefs untimely slain ; Whose limbs unbury'd on the naked
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6/14/11 The Greek Text
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6/14/11 Agamemnon and Achilles Quarrel between Achilles and Agamemnon over woman (Briseis) leading to strife ( stasis ) within Greek (Achaean) army mirrors strife between Trojans and Greeks caused by the passion of Paris for Helen .
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6/14/11 Agamemnon’s Choice What is Agamemnon’s choice? 1) Release daughter to her father Chryses. 2) Refuse.
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6/14/11 The Representation of Values Why does Agamemnon refuse? Greek society “shame culture” not “guilt culture”, i.e. acquisition and defense of honor ( tim ē ) of primary concern to Greeks. “In shame culture gods and men quick to resent slight.” (Dodds 32)
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6/14/11 Conduct and Its Consequences The Iliad works through the consequences of passion, war and strife which are viewed in ethical terms, e.g.: In what ways of how far
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This note was uploaded on 06/14/2011 for the course CLAS 240 taught by Professor Beck during the Spring '11 term at South Carolina.

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P8_S&C_Homer_Iliad - Homer The Iliad Click to edit...

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